My APEX was fine and then it wasn’t

I got a nasty shock this morning when I fired up my local Application Expression installation.

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It had been working fine and all of a sudden…just dead. I sounded like all of those family members that as I.T practitioners we have to deal with (and that we’re so sceptical of) when they say: “I didn’t change anything…it just stopped!” Smile

In keeping with the treatment of family members, I then adopted the advice that (more...)

2018-what grabbed your attention

Here are the blog posts that you hit on most this year, with the most viewed entry on top. Unsurprisingly it is about the release of 18c, but interestingly the ORA-14758 and the Active Sessions post have come up again from last years list, so it appears they are still common issues for the modern Oracle professional. And of course, it is nice to see that my Openworld Mega-download is helping the community.

Thanks for (more...)

Your New Years Resolution

Aligning roughly with the calendar year, based on the Chinese zodiak we’re about to go from the year of the dog to the year of the pig. But for me, in the “Information Technology Zodiak” Smile , 2018 was the year of the hack, just as it was in 2017 and just as it will be for 2019.

I’ve not dedicated much time to keeping a record of all of the high profile breaches this year, (more...)

Another day…another “use the right datatype” post

Here’s an interesting little oddity (aka bug) with scalar queries.

We’ll start with a simple working example


SQL> create table t1 ( c1 number );

Table created.

SQL> insert into t1 values (1);

1 row created.

SQL> create table t2 ( c1 int, c2 varchar2(10));

Table created.

SQL>
SQL> insert into t2 values(1,'t1');

1 row created.

SQL> insert into t2 values(1,'t01');

1 row created.

SQL> commit;

Commit complete.

SQL> exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats('','T1')

PL/SQL procedure successfully  (more...)

A Christmas Carol

You better watch out,
Let me tell you a fact.
If your SQL has literals,
You’re gonna be hacked.

SQL Injection is comin’ to town

We’ve got a library cache,
It’s memory all linked twice.
But it only works well,
When you’re binding all nice.

Santa Claus is comin’ to town

We know when you’ve been lazy,
And concatenated simple strings.
So just make sure you bind your stuff,
And don’t let the bad guys (more...)

Your AskTOM Top 10 for 2018

Here we go folks…here are the top 10 most viewed questions in AskTOM this year!

We’ll count them down from 10 to 1

10) Inserting values into a table with ‘&’

Viewed 80,000 times.

First asked in 2012, this actually is not a database issue but a client issue. Many client tools view ampersand as a substitution variable, and this they intercept the execution before the command is sent to the database. Full details here

(more...)

It’s all downhill past 30

Yes, it sounds like a lamentation of the aging process, and from my own experience, it is definitely true that the wheels started falling off for my knees, back and plenty of other body parts once I turned 30. But that is perhaps a legacy of too much alcohol, not eating well in my youth and failing to stretch rather than any particular chronological milestone Smile.

But this post is not about that. This one is (more...)

Automatic sequences not being dropped

One of the nice new things in 12c was the concept of identity columns. In terms of the functionality they provide (an automatic number default) it is really no different from anything we’ve had for years in the database via sequences, but native support for the declarative syntax makes migration from other database platforms a lot easier.

Under the covers, identity columns are implemented as sequences. This makes a lot of sense – why invent (more...)

The phantom tablespace

(Cueing my deep baritone Morpheus voice…) What if I told you that you can reference non-existent tablespaces in your DDL?

OK, it sounds like a gimmick but there is a real issue that I’ll get to shortly. But first the gimmick Smile

I’ve created a partitioned table called “T” (I’ll pause here for your applause at my incredible imagination skills for table naming Smile) and to show you the complete DDL, I’ll extract it using the (more...)

IRR function in PLSQL

We had an AskTOM question recently about how to calculate the IRR, ie, the Internal Rate of Return. To be honest, I had not really heard of the function, but readers were quick to point out to me that it was a commonly used function in the most “popular” database on earth, namely Microsoft Excel Smile

It turns out that it is an iterative function, ie, there is no equation that calculates it directly – you (more...)