Fixed in 12c? Instance CPU Consumption Reporting via v$sysstat

Is Oracle 12c Instance Level CPU Consumption Reporting Fixed?


I was curious if Oracle had fixed instance level v$sysstat CPU consumption statistic reporting in 12c. Why was a curious? Because in the past, the Oracle Database 6, 7, 8i, 9i, 10g, 11g have all incorrectly reported instance wide CPU consumption when (more...)

Fixed in 12c? Session CPU Consumption Statistics

What? Fixed? Problem? Huh?

While going through and checking and updating my Oracle Performance Firefighting course for Oracle Database 12c, I once again compared session level CPU consumption from v$session and v$sess_time_model. In the past v$sesstat server process CPU consumption could be significantly less than what is shown in v$sess_time_model. Also, (more...)

Is Oracle 12c Faster Than 11g?


I Know That's Not A Fair Question


Is 12c faster than 11g? Yeah, I know that's not a fair question. But I do want to know if 12c can process 1000 buffer gets faster than 11g... don't you?

I want to know how much CPU time is consumed when Oracle (more...)

Hmm… You Oracle Database Heretic!


Is it OK to be an Oracle Database heretic? 


Oracle Database performance tuning and analysis has come a long way in the last 20 years. First there was the “just add more resources” approach and tuning the blatantly poor SQL. Then there was ratio analysis, followed by wait event (more...)

Hmm… Cloud Vendors Want Efficient Systems

Of course they do. Right?


Oracle Database performance tuning and analysis has come a long way in the last 20 years. First there was the “just add more resources” approach and tuning the blatantly poor SQL. Then there was ratio analysis, followed by wait event analysis, time based analysis, and (more...)

Hum… Users Experience the Average SQL Elapsed Time

You're joking. Right?


Oracle Database performance tuning and analysis has come a long way in the last 20 years. First there was the “just add more resources” approach and tuning the blatantly poor SQL. Then there was ratio analysis, followed by wait event analysis, time based analysis, and unit of (more...)

Hum… Better Tools Are the Answer to Increased Complexity?

You're joking. Right?

Oracle performance analysis has come a long way in the last 20 years. First there was the “just add more resources” approach and tuning the blatantly poor SQL. Then there was ratio analysis, followed by wait event analysis, time based analysis, and unit of work time based (more...)

Are SQL CPU consumption times reliable?

Q: Are Oracle SQL CPU times reliable?


During performance analysis, it's usually important to collect the CPU consumption for specific SQL statements for opportunity and comparison analysis. There are multiple SQL CPU consumption data sources. I'm the type of person who asks, "Are they to be trusted? Is one method (more...)

How many CPU cores do I really have?


How Many CPU Cores Do I Really Have?


The view operating system statistic view v$osstat is can be misleading with regards to CPU cores. Not that the information is incorrect, it's well... let's say troubling. If I ask ten people to email a sample AWR report, I'm likely to see CPU core-like statistics such as CPU_SOCKETS, NUM_CPUS, VCPU, LCPU, CPU_THREADS, and probably a variety of other names. Wow… what a mess!

But I'd still like to know because it's important for my work. For two reasons:

First, it helps me to understand how high the CPU utilization can go before (more...)

Simple Way to Calculate OS CPU Utilization

Another (Simpler) Way to Calculate CPU Utilization


Back in April of 2011, I blogged about how to calculate the operating system CPU utilization from data in a Statspack or AWR report. All that is necessary is the report snapshot interval and a couple of columns from the Operating System Statistics view, v$osstat.

Utilization Made Easy


It's pretty simple actually. Utilization is simply requirements divided by capacity. If you have one cup that contains 1/2 cup of water, the cup is 50% full/busy/utilization/etc. Here is the basic utilization formula:

U = R / C

Where;

U is utilization
R is requirements
(more...)