An idealized log management and analysis system — from whom?

I’ve talked with many companies recently that believe they are:

  • Focused on building a great data management and analytic stack for log management …
  • … unlike all the other companies that might be saying the same thing :)
  • … and certainly unlike expensive, poorly-scalable Splunk …
  • … and also unlike less-focused vendors of analytic RDBMS (which are also expensive) and/or Hadoop distributions.

At best, I think such competitive claims are overwrought. Still, it’s a genuinely (more...)

Teradata bought Hadapt and Revelytix

My client Teradata bought my (former) clients Revelytix and Hadapt.* Obviously, I’m in confidentiality up to my eyeballs. That said — Teradata truly doesn’t know what it’s going to do with those acquisitions yet. Indeed, the acquisitions are too new for Teradata to have fully reviewed the code and so on, let alone made strategic decisions informed by that review. So while this is just a guess, I conjecture Teradata won’t say anything concrete (more...)

The point of predicate pushdown

Oracle is announcing today what it’s calling “Oracle Big Data SQL”. As usual, I haven’t been briefed, but highlights seem to include:

  • Oracle Big Data SQL is basically data federation using the External Tables capability of the Oracle DBMS.
  • Unlike independent products — e.g. Cirro — Oracle Big Data SQL federates SQL queries only across Oracle offerings, such as the Oracle DBMS, the Oracle NoSQL offering, or Oracle’s Cloudera-based Hadoop appliance.
  • Also unlike independent (more...)

21st Century DBMS success and failure

As part of my series on the keys to and likelihood of success, I outlined some examples from the DBMS industry. The list turned out too long for a single post, so I split it up by millennia. The part on 20th Century DBMS success and failure went up Friday; in this one I’ll cover more recent events, organized in line with the original overview post. Categories addressed will include analytic RDBMS (including data (more...)

MongoDB is growing up

I caught up with my clients at MongoDB to discuss the recent MongoDB 2.6, along with some new statements of direction. The biggest takeaway is that the MongoDB product, along with the associated MMS (MongoDB Management Service), is growing up. Aspects include:

  • An actual automation and management user interface, as opposed to the current management style, which is almost entirely via scripts (except for the monitoring UI).
    • That’s scheduled for public beta in May, (more...)

NoSQL vs. NewSQL vs. traditional RDBMS

I frequently am asked questions that boil down to:

  • When should one use NoSQL?
  • When should one use a new SQL product (NewSQL or otherwise)?
  • When should one use a traditional RDBMS (most likely Oracle, DB2, or SQL Server)?

The details vary with context — e.g. sometimes MySQL is a traditional RDBMS and sometimes it is a new kid — but the general class of questions keeps coming. And that’s just for short-request use (more...)

RDBMS and their bundle-mates

Relational DBMS used to be fairly straightforward product suites, which boiled down to:

  • A big SQL interpreter.
  • A bunch of administrative and operational tools.
  • Some very optional add-ons, often including an application development tool.

Now, however, most RDBMS are sold as part of something bigger.

Comments on the 2013 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Operational Database Management Systems

The 2013 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Operational Database Management Systems is out. “Operational” seems to be Gartner’s term for what I call short-request, in each case the point being that OLTP (OnLine Transaction Processing) is dubious term when systems omit strict consistency, and when even strictly consistent systems may (more...)

Thoughts on in-memory columnar add-ons

Oracle announced its in-memory columnar option Sunday. As usual, I wasn’t briefed; still, I have some observations. For starters:

  • Oracle, IBM, and Microsoft are all doing something similar …
  • … because it makes sense.
  • The basic idea is to take the technology that manages indexes — which are basically columns+pointers (more...)

Cloudera Sentry and other security subjects

I chatted with Charles Zedlewski of Cloudera on Thursday about security — especially Cloudera’s new offering Sentry — and other Hadoop subjects.

Sentry is:

  • Developed by Cloudera.
  • An Apache incubator project.
  • Slated to be rolled into CDH — Cloudera’s Hadoop distribution — over the next couple of weeks.
  • Only useful (more...)