Notes on vendor lock-in

Vendor lock-in is an important subject. Everybody knows that. But few of us realize just how complicated the subject is, nor how riddled it is with paradoxes. Truth be told, I wasn’t fully aware either. But when I set out to write this post, I found that it just kept growing longer.

1. The most basic form of lock-in is:

  • You do application development for a target set of platform technologies.
  • Your applications can’t run (more...)

Oracle as the new IBM — has a long decline started?

When I find myself making the same observation fairly frequently, that’s a good impetus to write a post based on it. And so this post is based on the thought that there are many analogies between:

  • Oracle and the Oracle DBMS.
  • IBM and the IBM mainframe.

And when you look at things that way, Oracle seems to be swimming against the tide.

Drilling down, there are basically three things that can seriously threaten Oracle’s market (more...)

Readings in Database Systems

Mike Stonebraker and Larry Ellison have numerous things in common. If nothing else:

  • They’re both titanic figures in the database industry.
  • They both gave me testimonials on the home page of my business website.
  • They both have been known to use the present tense when the future tense would be more accurate. :)

I mention the latter because there’s a new edition of Readings in Database Systems, aka the Red Book, available online, courtesy of (more...)

Transitioning to the cloud(s)

There’s a lot of talk these days about transitioning to the cloud, by IT customers and vendors alike. Of course, I have thoughts on the subject, some of which are below.

1. The economies of scale of not running your own data centers are real. That’s the kind of non-core activity almost all enterprises should outsource. Of course, those considerations taken alone argue equally for true cloud, co-location or SaaS (Software as a Service).

2. (more...)

Issues in enterprise application software

1. I think the next decade or so will see much more change in enterprise applications than the last one. Why? Because the unresolved issues are piling up, and something has to give. I intend this post to be a starting point for a lot of interesting discussions ahead.

2. The more technical issues I’m thinking of include:

  • How will app vendors handle analytics?
  • How will app vendors handle machine-generated data?
  • How will app vendors (more...)

Couchbase 4.0 and related subjects

I last wrote about Couchbase in November, 2012, around the time of Couchbase 2.0. One of the many new features I mentioned then was secondary indexing. Ravi Mayuram just checked in to tell me about Couchbase 4.0. One of the important new features he mentioned was what I think he said was Couchbase’s “first version” of secondary indexing. Obviously, I’m confused.

Now that you’re duly warned, let me remind you of aspects of (more...)

Notes on analytic technology, May 13, 2015

1. There are multiple ways in which analytics is inherently modular. For example:

  • Business intelligence tools can reasonably be viewed as application development tools. But the “applications” may be developed one report at a time.
  • The point of a predictive modeling exercise may be to develop a single scoring function that is then integrated into a pre-existing operational application.
  • Conversely, a recommendation-driven website may be developed a few pages — and hence also a few (more...)

Thoughts and notes, Thanksgiving weekend 2014

I’m taking a few weeks defocused from work, as a kind of grandpaternity leave. That said, the venue for my Dances of Infant Calming is a small-but-nice apartment in San Francisco, so a certain amount of thinking about tech industries is inevitable. I even found time last Tuesday to meet or speak with my clients at WibiData, MemSQL, Cloudera, Citus Data, and MongoDB. And thus:

1. I’ve been sloppy in my terminology around “geo-distribution”, in (more...)

An idealized log management and analysis system — from whom?

I’ve talked with many companies recently that believe they are:

  • Focused on building a great data management and analytic stack for log management …
  • … unlike all the other companies that might be saying the same thing :)
  • … and certainly unlike expensive, poorly-scalable Splunk …
  • … and also unlike less-focused vendors of analytic RDBMS (which are also expensive) and/or Hadoop distributions.

At best, I think such competitive claims are overwrought. Still, it’s a genuinely (more...)

Teradata bought Hadapt and Revelytix

My client Teradata bought my (former) clients Revelytix and Hadapt.* Obviously, I’m in confidentiality up to my eyeballs. That said — Teradata truly doesn’t know what it’s going to do with those acquisitions yet. Indeed, the acquisitions are too new for Teradata to have fully reviewed the code and so on, let alone made strategic decisions informed by that review. So while this is just a guess, I conjecture Teradata won’t say anything concrete (more...)