Issues in enterprise application software

1. I think the next decade or so will see much more change in enterprise applications than the last one. Why? Because the unresolved issues are piling up, and something has to give. I intend this post to be a starting point for a lot of interesting discussions ahead.

2. The more technical issues I’m thinking of include:

  • How will app vendors handle analytics?
  • How will app vendors handle machine-generated data?
  • How will app vendors (more...)

Couchbase 4.0 and related subjects

I last wrote about Couchbase in November, 2012, around the time of Couchbase 2.0. One of the many new features I mentioned then was secondary indexing. Ravi Mayuram just checked in to tell me about Couchbase 4.0. One of the important new features he mentioned was what I think he said was Couchbase’s “first version” of secondary indexing. Obviously, I’m confused.

Now that you’re duly warned, let me remind you of aspects of (more...)

Notes on analytic technology, May 13, 2015

1. There are multiple ways in which analytics is inherently modular. For example:

  • Business intelligence tools can reasonably be viewed as application development tools. But the “applications” may be developed one report at a time.
  • The point of a predictive modeling exercise may be to develop a single scoring function that is then integrated into a pre-existing operational application.
  • Conversely, a recommendation-driven website may be developed a few pages — and hence also a few (more...)

Thoughts and notes, Thanksgiving weekend 2014

I’m taking a few weeks defocused from work, as a kind of grandpaternity leave. That said, the venue for my Dances of Infant Calming is a small-but-nice apartment in San Francisco, so a certain amount of thinking about tech industries is inevitable. I even found time last Tuesday to meet or speak with my clients at WibiData, MemSQL, Cloudera, Citus Data, and MongoDB. And thus:

1. I’ve been sloppy in my terminology around “geo-distribution”, in (more...)

An idealized log management and analysis system — from whom?

I’ve talked with many companies recently that believe they are:

  • Focused on building a great data management and analytic stack for log management …
  • … unlike all the other companies that might be saying the same thing :)
  • … and certainly unlike expensive, poorly-scalable Splunk …
  • … and also unlike less-focused vendors of analytic RDBMS (which are also expensive) and/or Hadoop distributions.

At best, I think such competitive claims are overwrought. Still, it’s a genuinely (more...)

Teradata bought Hadapt and Revelytix

My client Teradata bought my (former) clients Revelytix and Hadapt.* Obviously, I’m in confidentiality up to my eyeballs. That said — Teradata truly doesn’t know what it’s going to do with those acquisitions yet. Indeed, the acquisitions are too new for Teradata to have fully reviewed the code and so on, let alone made strategic decisions informed by that review. So while this is just a guess, I conjecture Teradata won’t say anything concrete (more...)

The point of predicate pushdown

Oracle is announcing today what it’s calling “Oracle Big Data SQL”. As usual, I haven’t been briefed, but highlights seem to include:

  • Oracle Big Data SQL is basically data federation using the External Tables capability of the Oracle DBMS.
  • Unlike independent products — e.g. Cirro — Oracle Big Data SQL federates SQL queries only across Oracle offerings, such as the Oracle DBMS, the Oracle NoSQL offering, or Oracle’s Cloudera-based Hadoop appliance.
  • Also unlike independent (more...)

21st Century DBMS success and failure

As part of my series on the keys to and likelihood of success, I outlined some examples from the DBMS industry. The list turned out too long for a single post, so I split it up by millennia. The part on 20th Century DBMS success and failure went up Friday; in this one I’ll cover more recent events, organized in line with the original overview post. Categories addressed will include analytic RDBMS (including data (more...)

MongoDB is growing up

I caught up with my clients at MongoDB to discuss the recent MongoDB 2.6, along with some new statements of direction. The biggest takeaway is that the MongoDB product, along with the associated MMS (MongoDB Management Service), is growing up. Aspects include:

  • An actual automation and management user interface, as opposed to the current management style, which is almost entirely via scripts (except for the monitoring UI).
    • That’s scheduled for public beta in May, (more...)

NoSQL vs. NewSQL vs. traditional RDBMS

I frequently am asked questions that boil down to:

  • When should one use NoSQL?
  • When should one use a new SQL product (NewSQL or otherwise)?
  • When should one use a traditional RDBMS (most likely Oracle, DB2, or SQL Server)?

The details vary with context — e.g. sometimes MySQL is a traditional RDBMS and sometimes it is a new kid — but the general class of questions keeps coming. And that’s just for short-request use (more...)