Creating User Schema Table and Projections in Vertica

Vertica is a an exciting database with some real nifty features. Projections is a ground breaking unique feature of Vertica which dramatically increases performance benefits in terms of querying and space benefits in terms of compression.



Following test commands are impromptu sesssion in which a user is being created, then a schema is created, and that user is authorized on that schema. Then a table is created with a default superprojection and then a projection (more...)

Mongostat ; A Nifty Tool for Mongo DBA

One of the main Mongodb DBA's task is to monitor the usage of Mongodb system and it's load distribution. This could be needed for proactive monitoring, troubleshooting during performance degradation, root cause analysis, or capacity planning.

Mongostat is a nifty tool which comes out of the box with Mongodb which provides wealth of information in a nicely and familiar formatted way. If you have used vmstat, iostat etc on Linux; Mongostat should seem very familiar.


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Shift Command in Shell Script in AIX and Linux

Shell in Unix never ceases to surprise. Stumbled upon 'shift 2' command in AIX few hours ago and it's very useful.

'Shift n' command shifts the parameters passed to a shell script by 'n' numbers to the left.

For example:

if you have a shell script which takes 3 parameters like:

./mytest.sh arg1 arg2 arg3

and you use shift 2 in your shell script, then the values of arg1 and arg2 will be lost (more...)

Recover Oracle Undo Tablespace without Backup

Woke up with an issue regarding a Oracle 10.2.0 database on Linux complaining about an Undo file on startup.


sqlplus '/ as sysdba'

SQL*Plus: Release 10.2.0.3.0 - Production on Fri May 22 20:11:07 2015

Copyright (c) 1982, 2006, Oracle.  All Rights Reserved.

Connected to an idle instance.

SQL> startup pfile='init.ora'
ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area 2801795072 bytes
Fixed Size                  2075504 bytes
Variable Size            1275069584 bytes
(more...)

LPAR and Oracle Database

What is LPAR?

LPAR stands for Logical Partitioning and it's a feature of IBM's operating system AIX (Also available in Linux). By abstracting all the physical devices in a system, LPAR creates a virtualized computing environment.

In a server; the processor, memory, and storage are divided into multiple sets. Each set in a server consist of resources like processor, memory and storage. Each set is called as LPAR.

One server can have many LPARs operating (more...)

Showing Interval Partitons Code in DBMS_METADATA.GET_DDL


-- If you want to display the system generated partitions as part of the CREATE TABLE DDL, then set the EXPORT parameter of the dbms_metadata to true.

-- The default behavior of "DBMS_METADATA.GET_DDL" is that it does not show Interval Partitions created by the system for interval partitioned tables and indexes.

-- In the case of Interval Partitioning, New Partitions are created automatically when corresponding row is inserted.  This newly created partition information (more...)

Oracle Querayable Patch Interface

Starting from Oracle 12c, from within the SQL patching information can be obtained. A new package DBMS_QOPATCH offers some really nifty procedures to get the patch information. Some of that information is shared below:




To get patch information from the inventory:


SQL> select xmltransform(dbms_qopatch.get_opatch_install_info, dbms_qopatch.get_opatch_xslt) from dual;


Oracle Home      : /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0/db_1
Inventory      : /u01/app/oraInventory

The following is an equivalent of opatch lsinventory command at the OS level:

SQL> select (more...)