Performing in the cloud – network latency

To me, ‘cloud computing’ is renting a compute resource to perform a task. In order to use that compute resource, you need to instruct it to do something, which is typically done via the network. If the task the compute resource needs to fulfil is being an application server or being a client or both in the case of an application server that uses an Oracle database, the network latency between the client of the (more...)

An introduction to Performance Co Pilot, part 2.

This second blogpost on Performance Co Pilot or PCP in short is about visualisation. In case you haven’t read the first part, here it is, which describes how it works, why you should use it, and how you can install it.

Pmchart.
One way of visualising PCP is using the pmchart utility. The pmchart utility is installed via the pcp-gui package (yum install pcp-gui). The pmchart utility uses X to display a window and (more...)

Auditing Oracle database stopping and starting using the ELK stack

This blog post is about two things: one how you can monitor who is bringing you database up and down (there is a twist at the end!) and two how you can very conveniently do that with aggregated logs in a browser with a tool called ‘Kibana’, which is the K in ELK.

What is the ‘ELK stack’?
The ELK stack gets it’s name from Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana.
– Elasticsearch is an open (more...)

An introduction to PCP / Performance Co Pilot on Oracle Linux

I was investigating gathering performance data on (oracle) linux servers recently and came across Performance Co-Pilot (PCP). I have come across this product regularly in the past, but it seemed somewhat abstract to me, and I never ran into any actual usage. And we got sar for linux performance data and for the Oracle database we got oswatcher (and it’s exadata cousin exawatcher) and TFA right? How wrong I was.

First let me explain a (more...)

Advanced Oracle memory profiling using pin tool ‘pinatrace’

In my previous post, I introduced Intel Pin. If you are new to pin, please follow this link to my previous post on how to set it up and how to run it.

One of the things you can do with Pin, is profile memory access. Profiling memory access using the pin tool ‘pinatrace’ is done in the following way:

$ cd ~/pin/pin-3.0-76991-gcc-linux
$ ./pin -pid 12284 -t source/tools/SimpleExamples/obj-intel64/pinatrace.so

The pid is (more...)

Introduction to Intel Pin

This blogpost is an introduction to Intel’s Pin dynamic instrumentation framework. Pin and the pintools were brought to my attention by Mahmoud Hatem in his blogpost Tracing Memory access of an oracle process: Intel PinTools. The Pin framework provides an API that abstracts instruction-set specifics (on the CPU layer). Because this is a dynamic binary instrumentation tool, it requires no recompiling of source code. This means we can use it with programs like the Oracle (more...)

Redo a blogpost

This blogpost is about the Oracle redo log structures and redo efficiency in modern Oracle databases. Actually, a lot of subtle things changed surrounding redo (starting from Oracle 10 actually) which have gone fairly unnoticed. One thing the changes have gone unnoticed for is the Oracle documentation, the description of redo in it is an accurate description for Oracle 9, not how it is working in Oracle 10 or today in Oracle 12.1.0. (more...)

The curious case of the missing semctl call

This article is about the internals of how the Oracle database handles transactions. In this case the communication mechanism of foreground sessions to the logwriter process is examined. The tests in this article have been executed using the following versions:
– Oracle database 12.1.0.2.161018
– Oracle linux 7.2, kernel 4.1.12-61.1.14.el7uek.x86_64 (UEK4)

In my previous article, ‘Transactions and SCNs’, I talked about redo generation, (more...)

A technical security analysis of the snmp daemon on Exadata

Recently I was asked to analyse the security impact of the snmp daemon on a recent Exadata. This system was running Exadata image version 12.1.2.1.3. This blog article gives you an overview of a lot of the things that surround snmp and security.

First of all what packages are installed doing something with snmp? A list can be obtained the following way:

# rpm -qa | grep snmp
net-snmp-utils-5.5-54.0. (more...)

Transactions and SCNs

It’s general knowledge that the Oracle database is ACID compliant, and that SCNs or ‘system change numbers’ are at the heart of this mechanism. This blogpost dives into the details of how the Oracle engine uses these numbers.

Oracle database version 12.1.0.2.161018
Operating system version: OL 7.2, kernel: 4.1.12-61.1.14.el7uek.x86_64 (UEK4)

Redo generation
Whenever DML is executed, redo is generated in the form of ‘change (more...)