A look into Oracle redo, part 3: log writer work cycle overview

This is the third part of a series of blogposts on how the Oracle database handles redo. The previous part talked about the memory area that stores redo strand information: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-2-the-discovery-of-the-kcrfa-structure/.

The single most important process in the Oracle database for handling redo is the log writer, which primary task is flushing the redo information other Oracle database processes put in the public redo strands to disk. Now that we have investigated the (more...)

A look into Oracle redo, part 2: the discovery of the KCRFA structure

This is the second post in a series of blogposts on Oracle database redo internals. If you landed on this blogpost without having read the first blogpost, here is a link to the first blogpost: https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-1-redo-allocation-latches/ The first blogpost contains all the versions used and a synopsis on what the purpose of this series of blogposts is.

In the first part, I showed how the principal access to the public redo strands is (more...)

A look into Oracle redo, part 1: redo allocation latches

This will be a series of posts about Oracle database redo handling. The database in use is Oracle version 12.2.0.1, with PSU 170814 applied. The operating system version is Oracle Linux Server release 7.4. In order to look into the internals of the Oracle database, I use multiple tools; very simple ones like the X$ views and oradebug, but also advanced ones, quite specifically the intel PIN tools (https://software.intel. (more...)

Introduction to pinatrace annotate version 2: a look into latches again

This post is an introduction to pinatrace annotate version 2, which is a tool to annotate the output of the Intel Pin tools ‘pinatrace’ tool.

The pinatrace tool generates a file with every single memory access of a process. Please realise what this means: this is every single read from main memory or write to main memory from the CPU. This allows you to get an understanding what happens within a C function. This means (more...)

The hang manager

Recently I was looking in the trace directory in the diag dest of my (12.2.0.1) instance, and found some trace files which were different from the others:

$ ls | grep dia0
test_dia0_9711_base_1.trc
test_dia0_9711_base_1.trm
test_dia0_9711_lws_1.trc
test_dia0_9711_lws_1.trm
test_dia0_9711.trc
test_dia0_9711.trm

The dia0 ‘test_dia0_9711.trc’ file is fully expected. But what are these ‘..lws_1.trc’ and ‘..base_1.trc’ files? And ‘base’ is something that I understand, but (more...)

Oracle 12.1 big table caching IO code path

Recently I was triggered about the ‘automatic big table caching’ feature introduced in Oracle version 12.1.0.2 with Roger Macnicol’s blogpost about Oracle database IO and caching or not caching (https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-1 https://blogs.oracle.com/smartscan-deep-dive/when-bloggers-get-it-wrong-part-2). If you want to read something about the feature in general, search for the feature name, you’ll find several blogposts about it.

If you are not familiar with automatic big table caching, it’s a feature (more...)

Oracle C functions annotations

Warning! This is a post about Oracle database internals for internals lovers and researchers. For normal, functional administration, this post serves no function. The post shows a little tool I created which consists of a small database I compiled with Oracle database C function names and a script to query it. The reason that keeping such a database makes sense in the first place, is because the Oracle C functions for the Oracle database are (more...)

How to automatically build any recent version of the Oracle database.

There are many situations where you want to use a very specific configuration of the Oracle database, for example when a client has an issue and is still on EL5, or gets disk errors on a filesystem that is ext3, or is using ASM and gets weird IO patterns. Other examples are: you want to test the newest PSU to see if responds differently to an issue you are working on, or you want to (more...)

The full table scan direct path read decision for version 12.2

This post is about the decision the Oracle database engine makes when it is using a full segment scan approach. The choices the engine has is to store the blocks that are physically read in the buffercache, or read the blocks into the process’ PGA. The first choice is what I refer to as a ‘buffered read’, which places the block in the database buffercache so the process itself and other processes can bypass the (more...)

Installation of Rundeck with the Ansible plugin on Centos 7

This post shows you how to install Rundeck with the Ansible plugin on Centos 7. The installation is done with nginx as the web server and using SSL with a self signed certificate. Please read the Ansible installation script, and modify anything that should be different for your situation. You will be amazed how well readable the installation script is!

Rundeck is a web based user interface that allows you to run commands against a (more...)