Using Ansible for executing Oracle DBA tasks.

This post looks like I am jumping on the bandwagon of IT orchestration like a lot of people are doing. Maybe I should say ‘except for (die hard) Oracle DBA’s’. Or maybe not, it up to you to decide.

Most people who are interested in IT in general will have noticed IT orchestration has gotten attention, especially in the form of Puppet and/or Chef. I _think_ IT orchestration has gotten important with the rise of (more...)

Oracle IO wait events: db file sequential read

(the details are investigated and specific to Oracle’s database implementation on Linux x86_64)

Exadata IO: This event is not used with Exadata storage, ‘cell single block physical read’ is used instead.
Parameters:
p1: file#
p2: block#
p3: blocks

Despite p3 listing the number of blocks, I haven’t seen a db file sequential read event that read more than one block ever. Of course this could change in a newer release.

Implementation:
One of the important things (more...)

Exadata storage indexes and DML

Last week I’ve gotten a question on how storage indexes (SI) behave when the table for which the SI is holding data is changed. Based on logical reasoning, it can be two things: the SI is invalidated because the data it’s holding is changed, or the SI is updated to reflect the change. Think about this for yourself, and pick a choice. I would love to hear if you did choose the correct one.

First (more...)

Getting the database parameters from a spfile

There’s been some debate about how to get the parameters from a spfile. A spfile is a binary version of the parameter file of the Oracle database.

I added to the debate that my experience is that there are is some weirdness with using the strings command on the spfile. The discussion was on twitter, I didn’t add that doing that it most of the time meant it costed more time than I saved from (more...)

Reconstructing oratab from the cluster registry

At the Accenture Enkitec Group we have a couple of Exadata racks for Proof of Concepts (PoC), Performance validation, research and experimenting. This means the databases on the racks appear and vanish more than (should be) on an average customer Exadata rack (to be honest most people use a fixed few existing databases rather than creating and removing a database for every test).

Nevertheless we gotten in a situation where the /etc/oratab file was not (more...)

Using git for revision control for Oracle DBAs

This post is aimed at people working with code, scripts and/or any other means of textual files. I try to give my point of view on revision control and git as revision control system in particular.

The first thing you should ask yourself is: why using revision control in the first place? I think that’s a good and fair question. A lot of people I talk to see revision control as something that’s for developers (more...)

How Exadata smartscans work

I guess everybody who is working with Oracle databases and has been involved with Oracle Exadata in any way knows about smartscans. It is the smartscan who makes the magic happen of full segment scans with sometimes enormously reduced scan times. The Oracle database does smartscans which something that is referred to as ‘offloading’. This is all general known information.

But how does that work? I assume more people are like me, and are anxious (more...)

Systemtap revisited

Some time back, I investigated the options to do profiling of processes in Linux. One of the things I investigated was systemtap. After careful investigation I came to the conclusion that systemtap was not really useful for my investigations, because it only worked in kernelspace, only very limited in userspace. The limitation of working in userspace was that you had to define your own markers in the source code of the program you wanted to (more...)

IOUG Collaborate 2014 presentations are online!

This is a small announcement that the slides of all of my four presentations for IOUG Collaborate 2014 are online in the ‘whitepapers and presentations’ section of this blog.


Linux strace doesn’t lie after all.

strace is a linux utility to profile system calls. Using strace you can see the system calls that a process executes, to investigate inner working or performance. In my presentation about multiblock reads I put the text ‘strace lies’. This is NOT correct. My current understanding is that strace does show every system call made by an executable. So…why did I make that statement? (editorial note: this article dives into the inner working of Linux (more...)