Advanced Oracle memory profiling using pin tool ‘pinatrace’

In my previous post, I introduced Intel Pin. If you are new to pin, please follow this link to my previous post on how to set it up and how to run it.

One of the things you can do with Pin, is profile memory access. Profiling memory access using the pin tool ‘pinatrace’ is done in the following way:

$ cd ~/pin/pin-3.0-76991-gcc-linux
$ ./pin -pid 12284 -t source/tools/SimpleExamples/obj-intel64/pinatrace.so

The pid is (more...)

Introduction to Intel Pin

This blogpost is an introduction to Intel’s Pin dynamic instrumentation framework. Pin and the pintools were brought to my attention by Mahmoud Hatem in his blogpost Tracing Memory access of an oracle process: Intel PinTools. The Pin framework provides an API that abstracts instruction-set specifics (on the CPU layer). Because this is a dynamic binary instrumentation tool, it requires no recompiling of source code. This means we can use it with programs like the Oracle (more...)

Redo a blogpost

This blogpost is about the Oracle redo log structures and redo efficiency in modern Oracle databases. Actually, a lot of subtle things changed surrounding redo (starting from Oracle 10 actually) which have gone fairly unnoticed. One thing the changes have gone unnoticed for is the Oracle documentation, the description of redo in it is an accurate description for Oracle 9, not how it is working in Oracle 10 or today in Oracle 12.1.0. (more...)

The curious case of the missing semctl call

This article is about the internals of how the Oracle database handles transactions. In this case the communication mechanism of foreground sessions to the logwriter process is examined. The tests in this article have been executed using the following versions:
– Oracle database 12.1.0.2.161018
– Oracle linux 7.2, kernel 4.1.12-61.1.14.el7uek.x86_64 (UEK4)

In my previous article, ‘Transactions and SCNs’, I talked about redo generation, (more...)

A technical security analysis of the snmp daemon on Exadata

Recently I was asked to analyse the security impact of the snmp daemon on a recent Exadata. This system was running Exadata image version 12.1.2.1.3. This blog article gives you an overview of a lot of the things that surround snmp and security.

First of all what packages are installed doing something with snmp? A list can be obtained the following way:

# rpm -qa | grep snmp
net-snmp-utils-5.5-54.0. (more...)

Transactions and SCNs

It’s general knowledge that the Oracle database is ACID compliant, and that SCNs or ‘system change numbers’ are at the heart of this mechanism. This blogpost dives into the details of how the Oracle engine uses these numbers.

Oracle database version 12.1.0.2.161018
Operating system version: OL 7.2, kernel: 4.1.12-61.1.14.el7uek.x86_64 (UEK4)

Redo generation
Whenever DML is executed, redo is generated in the form of ‘change (more...)

Smoke and mirrors: monitoring function calls that do not exist anymore

During investigating I ran once again into statistics in the Oracle database that still provide a useful details, but the actual naming of the statistic is describing a situation that in reality does not exist anymore. The statistics I am talking about are ‘calls to kcmgcs’, ‘calls to kcmgrs’, ‘calls to kcmgas’ and ‘calls to get snapshot scn: kcmgss’.

Disclaimer: this is research. Any of these techniques potentially can crash your instance or leave your (more...)

Watching is in the eye of the beholder

Recently I was investigating the inner working of Oracle. One of the things that is fundamental to the Oracle database is the SCN (system change number). SCNs are used to synchronise changes in the database. There is one source for SCNs in every instance (kcbgscn; the global or current SCN in the fixed SGA), and there are multiple tasks for which Oracle keeps track of synchronisation using SCNs. A few of these tasks for which (more...)

How many memory is truly used by my Oracle instance?

There are many posts about the amount of memory that is taken by the Oracle database executables and the database SGA and PGA. The reason for adding yet another one on this topic is a question I recently gotten, and the complexities which surrounds memory usage on modern systems. The intention for this blogpost is to show a tiny bit about page sharing of linux for private pages, then move on to shared pages, and (more...)

How to make Apple Airport wifi routers do remote logging.

This is a blog not related to Oracle products in any way.

Remote logging.
This post is specific to apple Airport Extreme and Express wifi routers. However, in general: if you have multiple (unix/linux) servers, it makes sense to centralise the (sys)logging of these servers, in order to get a better overview on what is happening on these servers. I would want to go as far as saying that if you don’t you are simply (more...)