Table order

Over the last few days I’ve highlighted on Twitter a couple of older posts showing show a change in the order that tables appear in the from clause could affect the execution plan of a query. In one case the note was purely theoretical describing a feature of the way the optimizer works with simple query blocks, in the other case the note was about an anomaly with table elimination that could appear with both (more...)

num_index_keys

The title is the name of an Oracle hint that came into existence in Oracle 10.2.0.3 and made an appearance recently in a question on the rarely used “My Oracle Support” Community forum (you’ll need a MOS account to be able to read the original). I wouldn’t have found it but the author also emailed me the link asking if I could take a look at it.  (If you want to (more...)

Index Splits – 3

This is stored only for reference, and in case anyone wants to wade through the details. It’s the redo log dump from the 90/10 index leaf block split test from the previous blog posts running on 11.2.0.4 on Linux. The first part is the full block dump, the second part is an extract of the Record and Change vector headings with the embedded opcode (opc:) for the undo records in the redo (more...)

Where / Having

There’s a very old mantra about the use of the “having” clause that tells us that if it’s valid (i.e. will always give the same results) then any predicate that could be moved from the having clause to the where clause should be moved. In recent versions of Oracle the optimizer will do this for itself in some cases but (for reasons that I’m not going to mention) I came across a silly example (more...)

UKOUG Tech 18

One month to go before the big event in Liverpool. so I’ve been browsing the agenda to get some idea of the talks I’ll probably go to. At present this is what my list looksl like:

Sunday

14:00	Database block checking - the unknown truth
15:00	TBD
16:10	Oracle Database 12c consolidation: why and how to manage CPU resources
17:10	Securefiles - the hidden storage organisation inside LOB segments

Monday

 9:00	The Optimizer & the  (more...)

Join Cardinality – 5

So far in this series I’ve written about the way that the optimizer estimates cardinality for an equijoin where one end of the join has a frequency histogram and the other end has a histogram of type:

It’s now time to look at a join where the other end has a height-balanced histogram. Arguably it’s not sensible to spend time writing about this since you shouldn’t be creating them in 12c (depending, (more...)

Index Splits – 2

In yesterday’s article I described the mechanism that Oracle for an index leaf block split when you try to insert a new entry into a leaf block that is already full, and I demonstrated that the “50-50” split and the “90-10” split work in the same way, namely:

  • save the old block into the undo
  • prepare a new leaf block
  • “share” the data between the old and new leaf blocks
  • sort out pointers

The obvious (more...)

Index splits

After writing this note I came to the conclusion that it will be of no practical benefit to anyone …  but I’m publishing it anyway because it’s just an interesting little observation about the thought processes of some Oracle designer/developer. (Or maybe it’s an indication of how it’s sensible to re-use existing code rather than coding for a particular boundary case, or maybe it’s an example of how to take advantage of “dead time” to (more...)

Upgrades – again

I’ve got a data set which I’ve recreated in 11.2.0.4 and 12.2.0.1.

I’ve generated stats on the data set, and the stats are identical.

I don’t have any indexes or extended stats, or SQL Plan directives or SQL Plan Profiles, or SQL Plan Baselines, or SQL Patches to worry about.

I’m joinig two tables, and the join column on one table has a frequency histogram while the join column (more...)

Join Cardinality – 4

In previous installments of this series I’ve been describing how Oracle estimates the join cardinality for single column joins with equality where the columns have histograms defined. So far I’ve  covered two options for the types of histogram involved: frequency to frequency, and frequency to top-frequency. Today it’s time to examine frequency to hybrid.

My first thought about this combination was that it was likely to be very similar to frequency to top-frequency because (more...)