Re-partitioning – 18

In yesterday’s note on the options for converting a range-partioned table into a composite range/list parititioned table I mentioned that you could do this online with a single command in 18c, so here’s some demonstration code to demonstrate that claim:


rem
rem     Script:         pt_comp_from_pt_18.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          May 2019
rem

create table pt_range (
        id              number(8,0)     not null,
        grp             varchar2(1)     not null,
        small_vc        varchar2(10),
        padding         varchar2(100)
)
partition by range(id) (
         (more...)

Re-partitioning

I wrote a short note a little while ago demonstrating how flexible Oracle 12.2 can be about physically rebuilding a table online to introduce or change the partitioning while discarding data, and so on.  But what do you do (as a recent question on ODC asked) if you want to upgrade a customer’s database to meet the requirements of a new release of your application by changing a partitioned table into (more...)

Danger – Hints

It shouldn’t be possible to get the wrong results by using a hint – but hints are dangerous and the threat may be there if you don’t know eaxactly what a hint is supposed to do (and don’t check very carefully what has happened when you’ve used one that you’re not familiar with).

This post was inspired by a blog note from Connor McDonald titled “Being Generous to the Optimizer”. In his note Connor gives (more...)

Misleading Execution Plan

A couple of weeks ago I published a note about an execution plan which showed the details of a scalar subquery in the wrong place (as far as the typical strategies for interpreting execution plans are concerned). In a footnote to the article I commented that Andy Sayer had produced a simple reproducible example of the anomaly based around the key features of the query supplied in the original posting and had emailed it to (more...)

Execution Plan Puzzle

Here’s an execution plan that’s just been published on the ODC database forum. The plan comes from a call to dbms_xplan.display_cursor() with rowsource execution statistics enabled.

There’s something unusual about the execution statistics that I don’t think I’ve seen before – can anyone else see anytying really odd, or (better still) anything which they would expect others to find odd but which they can easily explain.

A couple of hints:

Occurence

Before you comment – I do know that the title has a spelling mistake in it. That’s because the Oracle code uses exactly this spelling in one of the little-used features of tracing.

I write a note a few years ago about enabling sql_trace (and other tracing events) system-wide for a single SQL statement. In the note I suggested that you could enable tracing for a few minutes then disable it to minimise the impact (more...)

LOB length

This note is a reminder combined with a warning about unexpected changes as you move from version to version. Since it involves LOBs (large objects) it may not be relevant for most people but since there’s a significant change in the default character set for the database as you move up to 18.3 (or maybe even as you move to 12.2) anyone using character LOBs may get a surprise.

Here’s a simple script (more...)

Parse Calls

When dealing with the library cache / shared pool it’s always worth checking from time to time to see if a new version of Oracle has changed any of the statistics you rely on as indicators of potential problems. Today is also (coincidentally) a day when comments about “parses” and “parse calls” entered my field of vision from two different directions. I’ve tweeted out references to a couple of quirkly little posts I did some (more...)

In-table predicates

This note was prompted by a recent email asking about the optimizer’s method for estimating the selectivity of a predicate which compared two columns in the same table – for example:  “where orders.amount_invoiced = orders.amount_paid”. It’s been about 14 years since I wrote “Cost Based Oracle – Fundamentals” so my memory of what I wrote (and whether I even mentioned this case) was rather hazy, so I sent off a quick reply and (more...)

Describe Upgrade

Here’s an odd little change between Oracle versions that could have a stunning impact on the application performance if the thing that generates your client code happens to use an unlucky selection of constructs.  It’s possible to demonstrate the effect remarkably easily – you just have to describe a table, doing it lots of times to make it easy to see what’s happening.


create table t1 as select * from all_objects
where rownum =  (more...)