ANSI expansion

Here’s a quirky little bug that appeared on the OTN database forum in the last 24 hours which (in 12c, at least) produces an issue which I can best demonstrate with the following cut-n-paste:


SQL> desc purple
 Name                                Null?    Type
 ----------------------------------- -------- ------------------------
 G_COLUMN_001                        NOT NULL NUMBER(9)
 P_COLUMN_002                                 VARCHAR2(2)

SQL> select p.*
  2  from GREEN g
  3    join RED r on g.G_COLUMN_001 = r.G_COLUMN_001
  4    join PURPLE p on g.G_COLUMN_001 = p. (more...)

ASH

There was a little conversation on Oracle-L about ASH (active session history) recently which I thought worth highlighting – partly because it raised a detail that I had got wrong until Tim Gorman corrected me a few years ago.

Once every second the dynamic performance view v$active_session_history copies information about active sessions from v$session. (There are a couple of exceptions to the this rule – for example if a session has called dbms_lock.sleep() it will appear (more...)

12c MView refresh

Some time ago I wrote a blog note describing a hack for refreshing a large materialized view with minimum overhead by taking advantage of a single-partition partitioned table. This note describes how Oracle 12c now gives you an official way of doing something similar – the “out of place” refresh.

I’ll start by creating a matieralized view and creating a couple of indexes on the resulting underlying table; then show you three different calls to refresh (more...)

Tablespace HWM

The following question appeared the Oracle-L list-server recently:

In order to resize a datafile to release space at the end, we need to find whatever the last block_id that is at the start of that free contiguous space.
Problem is that we have a very large database such that querying dba_extents to find the last block is probably not an option. The standard query(ies) that make use of dba_extents runs for hours at stretch and also  (more...)

Flashback Logging

One of the waits that is specific to ASSM (automatic segment space management) is the “enq: FB – contention” wait. You find that the “FB” enqueue has the following description and wait information when you query v$lock_type, and v$event_name:


SQL> execute print_table('select * from v$lock_type where type = ''FB''')
TYPE                          : FB
NAME                          : Format Block
ID1_TAG                       : tablespace #
ID2_TAG                       : dba
IS_USER                       : NO
DESCRIPTION                   : Ensures that only one process can format data  (more...)

Flashback logging

When database flashback first appeared many years ago I commented (somewhere, but don’t ask me where) that it seemed like a very nice idea for full-scale test databases if you wanted to test the impact of changes to batch code, but I couldn’t really see it being a good idea for live production systems because of the overheads.

Features and circumstances change, of course, and someone recently pointed out that if your production system is multi-terabyte and you’re (more...)

255 columns

Here’s a quick note, written and some strange time in (my) morning in Hpng Kong airport as I wait for my next flight – all spelling, grammar, and factual errors will be attributed to jet-lag or something.

And a happy new year to my Chinese readers.

You all know that having more than 255 columns in a table is a Bad Thing ™ – and surprisingly you don’t even have to get to 255 to (more...)

Parallel rownum

It’s easy to make mistakes, or overlook defects, when constructing parallel queries – especially if you’re a developer who hasn’t been given the right tools to make it easy to test your code. Here’s a little trap I came across recently that’s probably documented somewhere, which could be spotted easily if you had access to the OEM SQL Monitoring screen, but would be very easy to miss if you didn’t check the execution plan very carefully. (more...)

Functions & Subqueries

I think the “mini-series” is a really nice blogging concept – it can pull together a number of short articles to offer a much better learning experience for the reader than they could get from the random collection of sound-bites that so often typifies an internet search; so here’s my recommendation for this week’s mini-series: a set of articles by Sayan Malakshinov a couple of years ago comparing the behaviour of Deterministic Functions and Scalar (more...)

In-memory DB

A recent thread on the OTN database forum supplied some code that seemed to show that In-memory DB made no difference to performance when compared with the traditional row-store mechanism and asked why not.  (It looked as if the answer was that almost all the time for the tests was spent returning the 3M row result set to the SQL*Plus client 15 rows at a time.)

The responses on the thread led to the question: (more...)