Understanding SQL

From time to time someone publishes a query on the OTN database forum and asks how to make it go faster, and you look at it and think it’s a nice example to explain a couple of principles because it’s short, easy to understand, obvious what sort of things might be wrong, and easy to fix. Then, after you’ve made a couple of suggestions and explained a couple of ideas the provider simply fades into (more...)

Migrated rows

I received an email recently describing a problem with a query which was running a full tablescan but: “almost all the waits are on ‘db file sequential read’ and the disk read is 10 times the table blocks”.  Some further information supplied was that the tablespace was using ASSM and 16KB block size; the table had 272 columns (ouch!) and the Oracle version was 11.2.0.4.

In his researches he had (more...)

Quiz Night

How many rows will you return from a single table query if you include the predicate


        rownum > 2

in the where clause.

Warning: this IS a catch question

To make it easier and avoid ambiguity, you may assume the table is the standard SCOTT.EMP table.

 

Part 2:

This posting was prompted by noticing a note that Dominic Brooks posted a few months ago.

Can you supply a workaround for the little oddity (more...)

Instance stats

+

While reading a posting by Martin Bach on a new buffering option for 12c I was prompted to take a look at another of his posts on the instance activity stats, which reminded me that the class column on v$statname is a bit flag, which we can dissect using the bitand() function to pick out the statistics that belong to multiple classes. I’ve got 2 or 3 little scripts that do this one, (more...)

Parallel Query

According to the Oracle Database VLDB and Partitioning Guide (10g version and 11g version):

A SELECT statement can be executed in parallel only if the following conditions are satisfied:

  • The query includes a parallel hint specification (PARALLEL or PARALLEL_INDEX) or the schema objects referred to in the query have a PARALLEL declaration associated with them.
  • At least one table specified in the query requires one of the following:

Efficiency

Here’s a question to which I don’t know the answer, and for which I don’t think anyone is likely to need the answer; but it might be an entertaining little puzzle for thr curious.

Assume you’re doing a full tablescan against a simple heap table of no more than 255 columns (and not using RAC, Exadata, In-memory, etc. etc. etc.), and the query is something like:


select  {columns 200 to 250}
from    t1
where    (more...)

Parallel Execution

This is another little reference list I should have created some time ago. It covers a series of posts on interpreting parallel execution plans and understanding where the work happens.

Cost

I’ve just been checking “Cost Based Oracle – Fundamentals” (Apress 2005) to see what I said on a particular topic, and I couldn’t resist quoting the following from the opening page of Chapter 1:

One of the commonest questions about the CBO on the Internet is: “What does the cost represent?” This is usually followed by comments like: “According to explain plan the cost of doing a hash join for this query is seven (more...)

Not Exists

This whole thing about “not exists” subqueries can run and run. In the previous episode I walked through some ideas of how the following query might perform depending on the data, the indexes, and the transformation that the optimizer might apply:

select
        count(*)
from    t1 w1
where   not exists (
                select  1
                from    t1 w2
                where   w2.x = w1.x
                and     w2.y <> w1.y
);  

As another participant in the original OTN (more...)

Not Exists

Another question on a seemingly simple “not exists” query has appeared on OTN just a few days after my last post about the construct. There are two little differences between the actual form of the two queries that make it worth repeating the analysis.

The first query was of the form:


select from big_table
where  not exists (select exact_matching_row from small table);

while the new query is of the form:


select from big_table alias1
where  (more...)