Hash Partitions

Here’s an important thought if you’ve got any large tables which are purely hash partitioned. As a general guideline you should not need partition level stats on those tables. The principle of hash partitioned tables is that the rows are distributed uniformly and randomly based on the hash key so, with the assumption that the number of different hash keys is “large” compared to the number of partitions, any one partition should look the same (more...)

sys_op_lbid

I’ve made use of the function a few times in the past, for example in this posting on the dangers of using reverse key indexes, but every time I’ve mentioned it I’ve only been interested in the “leaf blocks per key” option. There are actually four different variations of the function, relevant to different types of index and controlled by setting a flag parameter to one of 4 different values.

The call to sys_op_lbid() (more...)

Append hint

One of the questions that came up on the CBO Panel Session at the UKOUG Tech2018 conference was about the /*+ append */ hint – specifically how to make sure it was ignored when it came from a 3rd party tool that was used to load data into the database. The presence of the hint resulted in increasing amounts of space in the table being “lost” as older data was deleted by the application which (more...)

12c Snapshots

I published a note a few years ago about using the 12c “with function” mechanism for writing simple SQL statements to takes deltas of dynamic performance views. The example I supplied was for v$event_histogram but I’ve just been prompted by a question on ODC to supply a couple more – v$session_event and v$sesstat (joined to v$statname) so that you can use one session to get an idea of the work done and time spent (more...)

Cartesian Join

I wrote this note a little over 4 years ago (Jan 2015) but failed to publish it for some reason. I’ve just rediscovered it and it’s got a couple of details that are worth mentioning, so I’ve decided to go ahead and publish it now.

A recent [ed: 4 year old] question on the OTN SQL forum asked for help in “multiplying up” data – producing multiple rows from a single row source. This is something (more...)

Hash Optimisation-

Franck Pachot did an interesting presentation at the OBUG (Belgium user group) Tech Days showing how to use one of the O/S debug/trace tools to step through the function calls that Oracle made during different types of joins. This prompted me to ask him a question about a possible optimisation of hash joins as follows:

The hash join operation creates an in-memory hash table from the rowsource produced by its first child operation then probes (more...)

Descending Problem

I’ve written in the past about oddities with descending indexes ( here, here, and here, for example) but I’ve just come across a case where I may have to introduce a descending index that really shouldn’t need to exist. As so often happens it’s at the boundary where two Oracle features collide. I have a table that handles data for a large number of customers, who record a reasonable number of transactions (more...)

DML Tablescans

This note is a follow-up to a recent comment a blog note about Row Migration:

So I wonder what is the difference between the two, parallel dml and serial dml with parallel scan, which makes them behave differently while working with migrated rows. Why might the strategy of serial dml with parallel scan case not work in parallel dml case? I am going to make a service request to get some clarifications but maybe (more...)

Hint Reports

Nigel Bayliss has posted a note about a frequently requested feature that has now appeared in Oracle 19c – a mechanism to help people understand what has happened to their hints.  It’s very easy to use, it’s just another format option to the “display_xxx()” calls in dbms_xplan; so I thought I’d run up a little demonstration (using an example I first generated 18 years and 11 versions ago) to make three points: first, (more...)

QC vs. PX

One last post before closing down for the Christmas break.

Here’s a little puzzle with a remarkably easy and obvious solution that Ivica Arsov presented at the UKOUG Tech2018 conference. It’s a brilliant little puzzle that makes a very important point, because it reminded me that most problems are easy and obvious only after you’ve seen them at least once. If you you’ve done a load of testing and investigation into something it’s easy to (more...)