Testing Amazon RDS for Oracle: Plotting Latency and IOPS for OLTP I/O Pattern

This is just a quick blog entry to direct readers to an article I recently posted on the AWS Database Blog. Please click through to give it a read: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/database/testing-amazon-rds-for-oracle-plotting-latency-and-iops-for-oltp-io-pattern/.

Thanks for reading my blog!

 


Filed under: oracle

Little Things Doth Crabby Make – Part XXII. It’s All About Permissions, Dummy. I Mean yum(8).

Good grief. This is short and sweet, I know, but this installment in the Little Things Doth Crabby Make series is just that–short and sweet. Or, well, maybe short and sour?

Not root? Ok, yum(8), spew out a bunch of silliness at me. Thanks.

Sometimes, little things doth, well, crabby make!

Hey, yum(8), That is Ridiculous User Feedback


Filed under: oracle

Step-By-Step SLOB Installation and Quick Test Guide for Amazon RDS for Oracle.

Before I offer the Step-By-Step guide, I feel compelled to answer the question that some exceedingly small percentage of readers must surely have in mind–why test with SLOB? If you are new to SLOB (obtainable here) and wonder why anyone would test platform suitability for Oracle with SLOB, please consider the following picture and read this blog post.

SLOB Is How You Test Platforms for Oracle Database.

Simply put, SLOB is the right tool (more...)

Little Things Doth Crabby Make – Part XXI. No, colrm(1) Doesn’t Work.

This is just another quick and dirty installment in the Little Things Doth Crabby Make series. Consider the man page for the colrm(1) command:

That looks pretty straightforward to me. If, for example, I have a 6-column text file and I only want to ingest from, say, columns 1 through 3,  I should be able to execute colrm(1) with a single argument: 4. I’m not finding the colrm(1) command to work in accordance with my (more...)

Little Things Doth Crabby Make. Part XX – Man Pages Matter! Um, Still.

It’s been a while since I’ve posted a Little Things Doth Crabby Make entry so here it is, post number 20 in the series. This is short and sweet.

I was eyeing output from the iostat(1) command with the -xm options on a Fedora 17 host and noticed the column heading were weird. I was performing a SLOB data loading test and monitoring the progress. Here is what I saw:

 

If that looks all (more...)

Announcing My Employer-Related Twitter Account

When I tweet anything about Amazon Web Services it will be on the following twitter handle:  https://twitter.com/ClossonAtWork (@ClossonAtWork).

If you’re interested in following my opinions on that twitter feed, please click and follow. Thanks.


Filed under: oracle

Announcing SLOB 2.4! Integrated Short Scans and Cloud (DBaaS) Support, and More.

This post is to announce the release of SLOB 2.4!

VERSION

SLOB 2.4.0. Release notes (PDF): Click Here.

WHERE TO GET THE BITS

As always, please visit the SLOB Resources page. Click Here.

NEW IN THIS RELEASE

  • Short Table Scans. This release introduces the ability to direct SLOB sessions to perform a percentage of all SELECT statements as full table scans against a small, non-indexed table. However, the size of the “scan (more...)

AWS Database Blog – Added To My Blog Roll

This is just a brief blog post to share that I’ve added the AWS Database Blog to my blogroll.  I recommend you do the same! Let’s follow what’s going on over there.

Some of my favorite categories under the AWS Database Blog are:

 

 

Readers: I do intent to eventually get proper credentials to make some posts on that (more...)

SLOB Use Cases By Industry Vendors. Learn SLOB, Speak The Experts’ Language.

This is just a quick blog entry to showcase a few of the publications from IT vendors showcasing SLOB. SLOB allows performance engineers to speak in short sentences. As I’ve pointed out before, SLOB is not used to test how well Oracle handles transaction. If you are worried that Oracle cannot handle transactions then you have bigger problems than what can be tested with SLOB. SLOB is how you test whether–or how well–a platform can (more...)

SLOB 2.3 Data Loading Failed? Here’s a Quick Diagnosis Tip.

The upcoming SLOB 2.4 release will bring improved data loading error handling. While still using SLOB 2.3, users can suffer data loading failures that may appear–on the surface–to be difficult to diagnose.

Before I continue, I should point out that the most common data loading failure with SLOB in pre-2.4 releases is the concurrent data loading phase suffering lack of sort space in TEMP. To that end, here is an example of (more...)

Yes, Storage Arrays Can Deduplicate Oracle Database. Here Is Exactly Why It Doesn’t Matter!

I recently had some cycles on a freshly installed Dell EMC XtremIO Storage Array. I took this opportunity to prepare a blog entry about the never-ending topic of whether or not storage arrays are able to reduce physical data capacity through deduplication of blocks in Oracle Database.

Of Course There Is Duplicate Data In Oracle Datafiles

Before I continue, let me say something that may come as a surprise to you. Yes, Oracle Database has (more...)

How Many ASM Disks Per Disk Group And Adding vs. Resizing ASM Disks In An All-Flash Array Environment

I recently posted a 4-part blog series that aims to inform readers that, in an All-Flash Array environment (e.g., XtremIO), database and systems administrators should consider opting for simplicity when configuring and managing Oracle Automatic Storage Management (ASM).

The series starts with Part I which aims to convince readers that modern systems, attached to All-Flash Array technology, can perform large amounts of low-latency physical I/O without vast numbers of host LUNs. Traditional storage (more...)

Resizing ASM Disks On Modern Systems. Real Application Clusters Doesn’t Make It Any More Difficult. An XtremIO Example With RAC.

My recent post about adding space to ASM disk groups by resizing them larger, as opposed to adding more disks, did not show a Real Application Clusters example. Readers’ comments suggested there is concern amongst DBAs that resizing disks (larger) in a RAC environment might somehow be more difficult than in non-RAC environments. This blog entry shows that, no, it is not more difficult. If anything is true it is that adding disks to ASM (more...)

Stop Constantly Adding Disks To Your ASM Disk Groups. Resize Your ASM Disks On All-Flash Array Storage. Adding Disks Is Really “The Y2K Way.” Here’s Why.

This blog post is centered on All-Flash Array(AFA) technology. I mostly work with EMC XtremIO but the majority of my points will be relevant for any AFA. I’ll specifically call out an array that doesn’t fit any of the value propositions / methods I’m writing about in this post.

Oracle Automatic Storage Management (ASM) is a very good volume manager and since it is purpose-built for Oracle Database it is the most popular storage presentation (more...)

Host I/O Queue Depth with XtremIO and SLOB Session Count. A Granular Look.

In my recent post about aggregate host I/O queue depth I shared both 100% SQL SELECT and 20% SQL UPDATE test results (SLOB) at varying LUN (ASM disk) counts. The LUNs mapped to XtremIO volumes but the assertions in that post were really applicable in most All-Flash Array situations.

I received quite a bit of email from readers about the granularity of session counts shown in the charts in that post. Overwhelmingly, folks asked to (more...)

Yes, Host Aggregate I/O Queue Depth is Important. But Why Overdo When Using All-Flash Array Technology? Complexity is Sometimes a Choice.

That’s The Way We’ve Always Done It

I recently updated the EMC best practices guide for Oracle Database on XtremIO. One of the topics in that document is how many host LUNs (mapped to XtremIO storage array volumes) should administrators use for each ASM disk group. While performing the testing for the best practices guide it dawned on me that this topic is suitable for a blog post. I think too many DBAs are still (more...)

Introducing a VCE White Paper. Consolidating SAP, SQL Server and Oracle Production/Test/Dev/OLTP and OLAP Into a Single XtremIO Array with VCE Converged Infrastructure.

This is just a short blog post to direct readers to a fantastic mixed-workload and heterogeneous database consolidation Proof of Concept. This VCE paper should not be missed. I assert that the VCE converged infrastructure platforms–most notably the Vblock 540–are the best off-the-shelf solution for provisioning XtremIO storage array all-flash storage to large numbers of hosts each processing vastly differing workloads (production,test/dev,OLTP,OLAP).

This paper is full of useful information. It explains the XtremIO 24:1 data (more...)

Expecting Sum-Of-Parts Performance From Shared Solid State Storage? I Didn’t Think So. Neither Should Exadata Customers. Here’s Why.

 

sum-of-parts

Last month I had the privilege of delivering the key note session to the quarterly gathering of Northern California Oracle User Group. My session was a set of vignettes in a theme regarding modern storage advancements. I was mistaken on how much time I had for the session so I skipped over a section about how we sometimes still expect systems performance to add up to a sum of its parts. This blog post (more...)

You Scratch Your Head And Ponder Why It Is You Go With Maximum Core Count Xeons. I Can’t Explain That, But This Might Help.

Folks that have read my blog for very long know that I routinely point out that Intel Xeon processors with fewer cores (albeit same TDP) get more throughput per core. Recently I had the opportunity to do some testing of a 2-socket host with 6-core Haswell EP Xeons (E5-2643v3) connected to networked all-flash storage. This post is about host capability so I won’t be elaborating on the storage. I’ll say that it was block storage, (more...)

Yes, You Must Use CALIBRATE_IO. No, You Mustn’t Use It To Test Storage Performance.

I occasionally get questions from customers and colleagues about performance expectations for the Oracle Database procedure called calibrate_io on XtremIO storage. This procedure must be executed in order to update the data dictionary. I assert, however, that it shouldn’t be used to measure platform suitability for Oracle Database physical I/O. The main reason I say this is because calibrate_io is a black box, as it were.

The procedure is, indeed, documented so it can’t (more...)