Sneak Preview of pgio (The SLOB Method for PostgreSQL) Part IV: How To Reduce The Amount of Memory In The Linux Page Cache For Testing Purposes.

I hope these sneak peeks are of interest…

PostgreSQL and Buffered I/O

PostgreSQL uses buffered I/O. If you want to test your storage subsystem capabilities with database physical I/O you have to get the OS page cache “out of the way”–unless you want to load really large test data sets.

Although pgio (the SLOB Method for PostgreSQL) is still in Beta, I’d like to show this example of the tool I provide for users to (more...)

Sneak Preview of pgio (The SLOB Method for PostgreSQL) Part III: Link To The Full README file for Beta pgio v0.9.

If you are interested in a head start on pgio, the following is a link to the full README file which has some loading and testing how-to:

The pgio text README file version 0.9 Beta

Sneak Preview of pgio (The SLOB Method for PostgreSQL) Part II: Bulk Data Loading.

Bulk Data Loading With pgio Version 0.9 Beta

Now that pgio (the SLOB Method for PostgreSQL) is in Beta users’ hands I’m going to make a few quick blog entries with examples of pgio usage. The following are screen grabs taken while loading 1 terabyte into the pgio schemas. As the example shows, pgio (on a system with ample storage performance) can ready a 1 terabyte data set for testing in only 1014 seconds (more...)

Sneak Preview of pgio (The SLOB Method for PostgresSQL) Part I: The Beta pgio README File.

The pgio kit is the only authorized port of the SLOB Method for PostgreSQL. I’ve been handing out Beta kits to some folks already but I thought I’d get some blogs posts underway in anticipation of users’ interest.

The following is part of the README.txt for pgio v0.9 (Beta). SLOB users will find it all easy to understand. This is the section of the README that discusses pgio.conf parameters:

UPDATE_PCT
The percentage  (more...)

SLOB Can Now Be Downloaded From GitHub.

This is a quick blog entry to announce that the SLOB distribution will no longer be downloadable from Syncplicity. Based on user feedback I have switched to making the kit available on GitHub. I’ve updated the LICENSE.txt file to reflect this distribution locale as authorized and the latest SLOB version is 2.4.2.1.

Please visit kevinclosson.net/slob for more information.

downloadbutton

Whitepaper Announcement: Migrating Oracle Database Workloads to Oracle Linux on AWS

This is just a quick blog entry to share a good paper on migrating Oracle Database workloads to Amazon Web Services EC2 instances running Oracle Linux.

Please click the following link for a copy of the paper:  Click Here.

 

White Paper Announcement: Benchmarking Amazon Aurora.

This is just a quick blog post to inform readers of a good paper that shows some how-to information for benchmarking Amazon Aurora. This is mostly about sysbench which is a test the transactional capabilities.

As an aside, many readers my have heard that I’m porting SLOB to PostgreSQL and will make that available in May 2018. It’ll be called “pgio” and is an implemention of the SLOB Method as described in the SLOB documentation. (more...)

A Word About Amazon EBS Volumes Presented As NVMe Devices On C5/M5 Instance Types.

If It Looks Like NVMe And Tastes Like NVMe, Well…

As users of the new Amazon EC2 C5 and M5 instance types are noticing, Amazon EBS volumes attached to C5 and M5 instances are exposed as NVMe devices. Please note that the link I just referred to spells this arrangement out as the devices being “exposed” as NVMe devices. Sometimes folks get confused over the complexities of protocol, plumbing and medium as I tend to (more...)

Testing Amazon RDS for Oracle: Plotting Latency and IOPS for OLTP I/O Pattern

This is just a quick blog entry to direct readers to an article I recently posted on the AWS Database Blog. Please click through to give it a read: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/database/testing-amazon-rds-for-oracle-plotting-latency-and-iops-for-oltp-io-pattern/.

Thanks for reading my blog!

 


Filed under: oracle

Little Things Doth Crabby Make – Part XXII. It’s All About Permissions, Dummy. I Mean yum(8).

Good grief. This is short and sweet, I know, but this installment in the Little Things Doth Crabby Make series is just that–short and sweet. Or, well, maybe short and sour?

Not root? Ok, yum(8), spew out a bunch of silliness at me. Thanks.

Sometimes, little things doth, well, crabby make!

Hey, yum(8), That is Ridiculous User Feedback


Filed under: oracle

Step-By-Step SLOB Installation and Quick Test Guide for Amazon RDS for Oracle.

Before I offer the Step-By-Step guide, I feel compelled to answer the question that some exceedingly small percentage of readers must surely have in mind–why test with SLOB? If you are new to SLOB (obtainable here) and wonder why anyone would test platform suitability for Oracle with SLOB, please consider the following picture and read this blog post.

SLOB Is How You Test Platforms for Oracle Database.

Simply put, SLOB is the right tool (more...)

Little Things Doth Crabby Make – Part XXI. No, colrm(1) Doesn’t Work.

This is just another quick and dirty installment in the Little Things Doth Crabby Make series. Consider the man page for the colrm(1) command:

That looks pretty straightforward to me. If, for example, I have a 6-column text file and I only want to ingest from, say, columns 1 through 3,  I should be able to execute colrm(1) with a single argument: 4. I’m not finding the colrm(1) command to work in accordance with my (more...)

Little Things Doth Crabby Make. Part XX – Man Pages Matter! Um, Still.

It’s been a while since I’ve posted a Little Things Doth Crabby Make entry so here it is, post number 20 in the series. This is short and sweet.

I was eyeing output from the iostat(1) command with the -xm options on a Fedora 17 host and noticed the column heading were weird. I was performing a SLOB data loading test and monitoring the progress. Here is what I saw:

 

If that looks all (more...)

Announcing My Employer-Related Twitter Account

When I tweet anything about Amazon Web Services it will be on the following twitter handle:  https://twitter.com/ClossonAtWork (@ClossonAtWork).

If you’re interested in following my opinions on that twitter feed, please click and follow. Thanks.


Filed under: oracle

Announcing SLOB 2.4! Integrated Short Scans and Cloud (DBaaS) Support, and More.

This post is to announce the release of SLOB 2.4!

VERSION

SLOB 2.4.0. Release notes (PDF): Click Here.

WHERE TO GET THE BITS

As always, please visit the SLOB Resources page. Click Here.

NEW IN THIS RELEASE

  • Short Table Scans. This release introduces the ability to direct SLOB sessions to perform a percentage of all SELECT statements as full table scans against a small, non-indexed table. However, the size of the “scan (more...)

AWS Database Blog – Added To My Blog Roll

This is just a brief blog post to share that I’ve added the AWS Database Blog to my blogroll.  I recommend you do the same! Let’s follow what’s going on over there.

Some of my favorite categories under the AWS Database Blog are:

 

 

Readers: I do intent to eventually get proper credentials to make some posts on that (more...)

SLOB Use Cases By Industry Vendors. Learn SLOB, Speak The Experts’ Language.

This is just a quick blog entry to showcase a few of the publications from IT vendors showcasing SLOB. SLOB allows performance engineers to speak in short sentences. As I’ve pointed out before, SLOB is not used to test how well Oracle handles transaction. If you are worried that Oracle cannot handle transactions then you have bigger problems than what can be tested with SLOB. SLOB is how you test whether–or how well–a platform can (more...)

SLOB 2.3 Data Loading Failed? Here’s a Quick Diagnosis Tip.

The upcoming SLOB 2.4 release will bring improved data loading error handling. While still using SLOB 2.3, users can suffer data loading failures that may appear–on the surface–to be difficult to diagnose.

Before I continue, I should point out that the most common data loading failure with SLOB in pre-2.4 releases is the concurrent data loading phase suffering lack of sort space in TEMP. To that end, here is an example of (more...)

Yes, Storage Arrays Can Deduplicate Oracle Database. Here Is Exactly Why It Doesn’t Matter!

I recently had some cycles on a freshly installed Dell EMC XtremIO Storage Array. I took this opportunity to prepare a blog entry about the never-ending topic of whether or not storage arrays are able to reduce physical data capacity through deduplication of blocks in Oracle Database.

Of Course There Is Duplicate Data In Oracle Datafiles

Before I continue, let me say something that may come as a surprise to you. Yes, Oracle Database has (more...)

How Many ASM Disks Per Disk Group And Adding vs. Resizing ASM Disks In An All-Flash Array Environment

I recently posted a 4-part blog series that aims to inform readers that, in an All-Flash Array environment (e.g., XtremIO), database and systems administrators should consider opting for simplicity when configuring and managing Oracle Automatic Storage Management (ASM).

The series starts with Part I which aims to convince readers that modern systems, attached to All-Flash Array technology, can perform large amounts of low-latency physical I/O without vast numbers of host LUNs. Traditional storage (more...)