Ansible tips’n’tricks: executing related tasks together

I have recently written an ansible playbook to apply one-off patches to an Oracle Home. While doing this, I hit a little snag that needed ironing out. Before continuing this post, it’s worth pointing out that I’m on:

$ ansible --version
ansible 2.6.5

And it’s Ansible on Fedora.

Most likely the wrong way to do this …

So after a little bit of coding my initial attempt looked similar to this:

$ cat  (more...)

Using colplot to visualise performance data

Back in 2011 I wrote a blog post about colplot but at that time focused on running the plot engine backed by a web server. However some people might not want to take this approach, and thinking about security it might not be the best idea in the world anyway. A port that isn’t opened can’t be scanned for vulnerabilities…

So what is colplot anyway? And why this follow-up to a 7 year old post?

Some (more...)

Running orachk as part of TFA with support tools bundle

I have previously written a number of posts about OSWatcher integration in Tracefile Analyzer (TFA) w/support tools bundle (available from My Oracle Support Document ID 1513912.1). Thus far I have neglected another useful tool available to administrators in the same package: orachk.

Summary of the environment

My lab system used for this post uses Oracle Restart 12.1.0.2 on top of Oracle Linux 7.4. I installed TFA 18.3 to /opt/tfa. (more...)

Little things worth knowing: OSWatcher Analyser Dashboard

I have written a few articles about Tracefile Analyzer (TFA) in the recent past. As you may recall from these posts, a more comprehensive TFA version than the one provided with the installation media is available from My Oracle Support (MOS for short). As part of this version, you get a lot of useful, additional tools, including OSWatcher. I love OSWatcher, simply because it gives me insights that would be very hard to get with (more...)

Ansible tips’n’tricks: assessing your runtime environment

One thing that I frequently need to do is test for a certain condition, and fail if it is not met. After all, I want to write those playbooks in a safe way.

Here is an example: I need to ensure that my playbook only runs on Oracle Linux 7. How can I do this? Ansible offers a shell and a command module (make sure you read the notes in the command module documentation!), (more...)

Ansible tips’n’tricks: even more output options

In my last post I wrote about the “debug” option to format Ansible output differently. I came across this setting simply by searching the usual developer forums for an alternative Ansible output option.

Having found out about the “debug” option made me curious, especially since there wasn’t an awful lot of documentation available about additional alternatives. Or so It thought before writing this post, there is actually, as you will see later. So to recap (more...)

Ansible tips’n’tricks: a different output option

When running ansible scripts, occasionally you wonder why a given task has failed. I found out more than once that it’s commonly a problem with the script, not the engine ;) Finding out exactly where in the script I made the mistake can be more of a challenge.

With the default ansible settings, output can be a bit hard to read. Consider this example: I do quite a bit of patching in my lab, and (more...)

Ansible tips’n’tricks: a new series

In the past few months I have spent considerable amounts of time working on new technology (new as in “new to me”) and one of the things I have found a great interest-and more importantly-use cases with, is ansible. I don’t know how it is with you, but if I don’t have a practical use case for using a technology I find it hard to get familiar with it.

Ansible is a fantastic piece of (more...)

Creating a RAC 12.1 Data Guard Physical Standby environment (3b)

Huh, what is this I hear you ask? Part 3b? Oracle 12.1? Well, there’s a bit of a story to this post. Back in December 2016 I started to write a series of blog posts (part 1 | part 2 | part 3 | part 4) about how I created a standby database on RAC 12.1. For some reason I forgot to post this part. Up until now the step where (more...)

RAC One node databases are relocated by opatchauto in 12.2 part 2

In a previous post I shared how I found out that RAC One Node databases are relocated on-line during patching and I promised a few more tests and sharing of implications. If you aren’t familiar with RAC One Node I recommend having a look at the official documentation: The Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide features it prominently in the introduction. One of the things I like to keep in mind when working with (more...)