Point to Ponder: The most important insight about Oracle Database upgrades?

Someone recently gave me an insight with which you would probably agree with: If query performance is satisfactory before and after the upgrade, then business users are unlikely to complain if new optimizer features are not being used after the upgrade.(read more)

Intro to Database Security – Part 5

In the previous parts I talked about security of the application and infrastructure layer of database security. This will be the last post in the series and I want to dedicated it to a very important topic that is not a database only issue – passwords. Links to the previous posts: Part 1 – general […]

Join predicate pushdown

When a query contains a regular or inline view, there are 3 basic strategies for the optimizer to choose from:

1) merge the view (no “VIEW” operation in the plan)
2) instantiate the view as the whole and join it to the rest of the query (the plan shows a VIEW “operation”)
3) push join predicates inside the view (the plan shows “VIEW PUSHED PREDICATE”).

The last strategy in that list is similar to a (more...)

Good bye Quest!

You may have read that Francisco Partners and Elliott Management have entered into an agreement to  Acquire the Dell Software Group – largely composed of the Quest software company bought from Dell in 2012 .   I’ve worked at Quest since 1998, but alas I will not be participating in this next stage of the Quest journey.
Although the timing of the announcement was influenced by the logistics of this sale, it is actually a (more...)

Tales from the field: potential reasons for PDB plug-in violations part 1

Container Databases have been an area that I have researched intensively over the past years. With this post (and hopefully some others that follow) I would like to demonstrate some of the new situations the DBA might be confronted with. Please don’t use this post to give the new 12c architecture a hard time: standardised deployments (which I love) help you a lot. Not only do your DBA scripts work reliably everywhere, but the error condition (more...)

Expecting Sum-Of-Parts Performance From Shared Solid State Storage? I Didn’t Think So. Neither Should Exadata Customers. Here’s Why.

 

sum-of-parts

Last month I had the privilege of delivering the key note session to the quarterly gathering of Northern California Oracle User Group. My session was a set of vignettes in a theme regarding modern storage advancements. I was mistaken on how much time I had for the session so I skipped over a section about how we sometimes still expect systems performance to add up to a sum of its parts. This blog post (more...)

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 4.23 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This version comes only with minor changes, see the change log below.

Here are the notes from the change log:

- Finally corrected the very old and wrong description of "wait times" in the script comments, where it was talking about "in-flight" wait events but that is not correct. ASH performs a "fix-up" (more...)

Using Adaptive Cursors Sharing with SQL Plan Baselines

We have several databases where automatic capturing of sql plan baselines is enabled for a few schemas.

Execution of some queries deeply depend on variables where is not always the best to reuse same execution plan for all executions. For those queries I want to avoid using literals and inefficient execution plans. Also, I want to use SQL plan baselines as I have automatic capturing enabled.

Question is, can I make Adaptive Cursor Sharing to (more...)

Index Sanity

By popular demand (well, one person emailed me to ask for it) I’m going to publish the source code for a little demo I’ve been giving since the beginning of the millenium – it concerns indexes and the potential side effects that you can get when you drop an index that you’re not using. I think I’ve mentioned the effect several times in the history of this blog, but I can’t find an explicit piece (more...)

Examining The Remains


"Don't you know anything at all about numbers?"
"Well, I don't think they're very important," snapped Milo, too embarrassed to admit the truth.
"NOT IMPORTANT!" roared the Dodecahedron, turning red with fury.  "Could you have tea for two 
without the two, or three blind mice without the three? Would there be four corners of the earth 
if there weren't a four? And how would you sail the seven seas without a seven?"
 (more...)

Join cardinality

In my previous post I showed an example of how a query’s performance can be improved using the waste minimization technique. My focus was primarily on identifying and enforcing the correct plan, but I received some questions regarding the root cause of the problem: why the optimizer came up with a wrong join order? It’s a very interesting question, and it deserves a separate post so that it could be explored in detail.

Let’s take (more...)

dbms_output and the scheduler

One of the nifty things in 12c is the ability to pick up DBMS_OUTPUT output from your scheduler jobs. So if you haven’t built an extensive instrumentation or logging facility, you’ll still have some details you can pick up from the scheduler dictionary views. Let’s look at an example


SQL> create or replace
  2  procedure do_stuff is
  3  begin
  4    dbms_output.put_line('Commenced');
  5    dbms_lock.sleep(30);
  6    dbms_output.put_line('Working');
  7    dbms_lock.sleep(30);
  8    dbms_output.put_line('Done');
  9   (more...)

Top Reason I’ve Learned Everyone Should Use Delphix- Week 2

I’ve been going through some SERIOUS training in just over a week.  This training has successfully navigated the “Three I’s”, as in its been Interesting, Interactive and Informative.  The offerings are very complete and the knowledge gained is limitless.

I’d also like to send a shout out to Steve Karam, Leighton Nelson and everyone else at Delphix who’s had a hand in designing the training, (more...)

Never …

From time to time a question comes up on OTN that results in someone responding with the mantra: “Never do in PL/SQL that which can be done in plain  SQL”. It’s a theme I’ve mentioned a couple of times before on this blog, most recently with regard to Bryn Llewellyn’s presentation on transforming one table into another and Stew Ashton’s use of Analytic functions to solve a problem that I got stuck with.

Here’s a (more...)

Granular detail from a summary

We had an interesting question on AskTom a few days ago.  Given a set of 12 values (forecasts in this case), one for each month of the year , can we manufacture a set of weekly forecasts for the same period.  Now it is perhaps a little dubious to “invent” detailed data out of summarised data, but we can come up with a reasonable algorithm for doing so.

We could simply divide each (more...)

Intro to Database Security – Part 4

In the previous parts I talked about database security and the infrastructure part of database security. In this post I will discuss the development aspect of the database. Links to the previous posts: Part 1 – general introduction to security Part 2 – introduction to database security Part 3 – infrastructure aspect of database security […]

HP Systems Management vacancies – Bradford , West Yorkshire

I have recently taken over our Systems  Management team and we have several vacancies for people used to working with the HP toolset. I know my blog is read almost entirely by DBAs but I am sure some of you work with Systems management teams and hopefully you can pass a link on to anyone you think might be interested.

The main tools used are

  • HP Service manager 9.x
  • HP Operations manager for Windows, (more...)

Conditional SQL- 6

An odd little anomaly showed up on the OTN database forum a few days ago where a query involving a table covered by Oracle Label Security (OLS) seemed to wrap itself into a non-mergeable view when written using traditional Oracle SQL, but allowed for view-merging when accessed through ANSI standard SQL. I don’t know why there’s a difference but it did prompt a thought about non-mergeable views and what I’ve previously called “conditional SQL” – (more...)

Query tuning by waste minimization: a real-life example

Today I’d like to share another tuning example from a recent case at work, which in my opinion is good for illustrating typical steps involved in SQL optimization process.

I was handed a poorly performing query with a relatively verbose text, so I will only give the general structure here (it will also prevent me from accidentally disclosing some sensitive information from that application):

SELECT 
       /* long list of columns here */
       ,
	   (select *  (more...)

Oracle DBA vacancy – Bradford, West Yorkshire

My team has a permanent vacancy which almost anyone could apply for.

We are looking for a good DBA with RAC, RMAN and Dataguard skills

We  are thinking that we might wish to take on a Junior DBA who has some skills but maybe not all three listed above.

We would also consider someone who has no real experience  – maybe has used RDBMS at University

Whoever we take-on will get a broad experience of (more...)