The Importance of the In-Memory DUPLICATE Clause for a RAC System

With the INMEMORY clause you can specify 4 sub-clauses:

  • The MEMCOMPRESS clause specifies whether and how compression is used
  • The PRIORITY clause specifies the priority (“order”) in which the segments are loaded when the IMCS is populated
  • The DISTRIBUTE clause specifies how data is distributed across RAC instances
  • The DUPLICATE clause specifies whether and how data is duplicated across RAC instances

The aim of this post is not to describe these attribues in detail. Instead, (more...)

12.1.0.2 Introduction to Zone Maps Part II (Changes)

In Part I, I discussed how Zone Maps are new index like structures, similar to Exadata Storage Indexes, that enables the “pruning” of disk blocks during accesses of the table by storing the min and max values of selected columns for each “zone” of a table. A Zone being a range of contiguous (8M) blocks. I […]

Exadata and Virtual Private Database: will it offload my query?

During one of the classes I taught about Exadata optimisations I had an interesting question:

If I am using VPD, will Exadata still offload the query?

Background is that we discussed function offloading, and the meta-view v$sqlfn_metadata. It turned out that SYS_CONTEXT() is not offloadable in 11.2.0.4.

SQL> select name,datatype,analytic,aggregate,offloadable,descr
  2  from v$sqlfn_metadata where name = 'SYS_CONTEXT';

NAME                                               DATATYPE ANA AGG OFF DESCR
-------------------------------------------------- -------- --- --- --- ------------------------------
SYS_CONTEXT                                        UNKNOWN  NO   (more...)

Exadata Shellshock: IB Switches Vulnerable

Andy Colvin has the lowdown on the Oracle response and fixes for the bash shellshock vulnerability.

However, when I last looked it seemed Oracle had not discussed anything regarding the IB switches being vulnerable.

The IB switches have bash running on them and Oracle have verified the IB switches are indeed vulnerable.


[root@dm01dbadm01 ~]# ssh 10.200.131.22

root@10.200.131.22's password:

Last login: Tue Sep 30 22:46:41 2014 from dm01dbadm01.e-dba.com

 (more...)

Exadata and Bash Shellshock

There has recently been a lot of news about the exploit revealed in the bash shell.  While the fix is very quick to implement, there are a couple of tricks that are required to install this update on an Exadata environment.  According to Oracle support note #1405320.1, Exadata storage server versions 11.2.3.x.x and 12.1.1.x.x are susceptible to the exploit.  On a typical Oracle Enterprise Linux, a simple (more...)

Exadata: What’s Coming

This is based on the presentation Juan Loaiza gave regarding What’s new with Exadata. While a large part of the presentation focussed on what was already available, there are quite a few interesting new features that are coming down the road.

First of was a brief mention of the hardware. I’m less excited about this. The X4 has plenty of the hardware that you could want: CPU, memory and flash. You’d expect some or all (more...)

eSP

eSPEnkitec’s Sizing and Provisioning (eSP) is a new internal tool designed and developed with Oracle Engineered Systems in mind. Thanks to the experience and insights from Randy Johnson, Karl Arao and Frits Hoogland, what began as a pet project for some of us, over time became an actual robust APEX/PLSQL application, developed by Christoph Ruepprich and myself, and ready to debut at Oracle Open World 2014.

This posting is about eSP, what it does, and (more...)

ASM Diskgroup shows USABLE_FILE_MB value in Negative

Today while working on ASM diskgroup i noticed Negative value for USABLE_FILE_MB. I was little surprised as it has been pretty long that i worked on ASM. So i started looking around for blogs and mos docs and found few really nice one around. A negative value for USABLE_FILE_MB means that you do not have [&hellip

About index range scans, disk re-reads and how your new car can go 600 miles per hour!

Despite the title, this is actually a technical post about Oracle, disk I/O and Exadata & Oracle In-Memory Database Option performance. Read on :)

If a car dealer tells you that this fancy new car on display goes 10 times (or 100 or 1000) faster than any of your previous ones, then either the salesman is lying or this new car is doing something radically different from all the old ones. You don’t just get orders of magnitude (more...)

12c HCC Row-Level Locking

In Oracle Database 12c we can find many new and shiny things… So many that we can miss the little good things really easy. I think that this one, is one of them. Previously I made a post “All About HCC“, describing how HCC is working and some of the issues that we can hit […]

Intra-Database IORM in action

I have been teaching the Enkitec Exadata Administration Class this week and made an interesting observation I thought was worth sharing with regards to IO Resource Management on Exadata.

I have created a Database Resource Manager (DBRM) Plan that specifically puts a resource consumer group to a disadvantage. Actually, quite severely so but the following shouldn’t be a realistic example in the first place: I wanted to prove a point. Hang-on I hear you say: you (more...)

Oracle IO wait events: db file sequential read

(the details are investigated and specific to Oracle’s database implementation on Linux x86_64)

Exadata IO: This event is not used with Exadata storage, ‘cell single block physical read’ is used instead.
Parameters:
p1: file#
p2: block#
p3: blocks

Despite p3 listing the number of blocks, I haven’t seen a db file sequential read event that read more than one block ever. Of course this could change in a newer release.

Implementation:
One of the important things (more...)

Clobbering grub.conf is Bad

I’m sharing this in the hope of saving someone from an unwelcome surprise.

Background

I recent upgraded an Exadata system from 11.2.3.2.1 to 11.2.3.3.1. Apart from what turns out to be a known bug[1] that resulted in the patching of the InfiniBand switches “failing”, it all seemed to go without a snag. That’s until I decided to do some node failure testing…

Having forced a node (more...)

Exadata Zone Maps

Just a quick post on a new Exadata feature called Zone Maps. They’re similar to storage indexes on Exadata, but with more control (you can define the columns and how the data is refreshed for example). People have complained for years that storage indexes provided no control mechanisms, but now we have a way to exert our God given rights as DBA’s to control yet another aspect of the database. Here’s a link to the (more...)

That’s … Huge!

Recently I’ve noticed the occasional thread in Oracle newsgroups and lists asking about hugepages support in Linux, including ‘best practices’ for hugepages configuration. This information is out on that ‘world-wide web’ in various places; I’d rather put a lot of that information in this article to provide an easier way to get to it. I’ll cover what hugepages are, what they do, what they can’t do and how best to allocate them for your particular (more...)

The point of predicate pushdown

Oracle is announcing today what it’s calling “Oracle Big Data SQL”. As usual, I haven’t been briefed, but highlights seem to include:

  • Oracle Big Data SQL is basically data federation using the External Tables capability of the Oracle DBMS.
  • Unlike independent products — e.g. Cirro — Oracle Big Data SQL federates SQL queries only across Oracle offerings, such as the Oracle DBMS, the Oracle NoSQL offering, or Oracle’s Cloudera-based Hadoop appliance.
  • Also unlike independent (more...)

21st Century DBMS success and failure

As part of my series on the keys to and likelihood of success, I outlined some examples from the DBMS industry. The list turned out too long for a single post, so I split it up by millennia. The part on 20th Century DBMS success and failure went up Friday; in this one I’ll cover more recent events, organized in line with the original overview post. Categories addressed will include analytic RDBMS (including data (more...)

Exadata storage indexes and DML

Last week I’ve gotten a question on how storage indexes (SI) behave when the table for which the SI is holding data is changed. Based on logical reasoning, it can be two things: the SI is invalidated because the data it’s holding is changed, or the SI is updated to reflect the change. Think about this for yourself, and pick a choice. I would love to hear if you did choose the correct one.

First (more...)

User Group Meetings Next Week (free training everyone!)

I know, posts about up-coming user group meetings are not exactly exciting, but it’s good to be reminded. You can’t beat a bit of free training, can you?

On Monday 14th I am doing a lightning talk at the 4th Oracle Midlands event. The main reason to come along is to see Jonathan Lewis talk about designing efficient SQL and then he will also do a 10 minute session on Breaking Exadata (to achieve that (more...)

Reconstructing oratab from the cluster registry

At the Accenture Enkitec Group we have a couple of Exadata racks for Proof of Concepts (PoC), Performance validation, research and experimenting. This means the databases on the racks appear and vanish more than (should be) on an average customer Exadata rack (to be honest most people use a fixed few existing databases rather than creating and removing a database for every test).

Nevertheless we gotten in a situation where the /etc/oratab file was not (more...)