MongoDB is growing up

I caught up with my clients at MongoDB to discuss the recent MongoDB 2.6, along with some new statements of direction. The biggest takeaway is that the MongoDB product, along with the associated MMS (MongoDB Management Service), is growing up. Aspects include:

  • An actual automation and management user interface, as opposed to the current management style, which is almost entirely via scripts (except for the monitoring UI).
    • That’s scheduled for public beta in May, (more...)

NoSQL vs. NewSQL vs. traditional RDBMS

I frequently am asked questions that boil down to:

  • When should one use NoSQL?
  • When should one use a new SQL product (NewSQL or otherwise)?
  • When should one use a traditional RDBMS (most likely Oracle, DB2, or SQL Server)?

The details vary with context — e.g. sometimes MySQL is a traditional RDBMS and sometimes it is a new kid — but the general class of questions keeps coming. And that’s just for short-request use (more...)

A look into Amazon DynamoDB

Why noSQL ?

From past few years (after 2009) we are seeing high trend towards noSQL databases. Many big enterprises are exploring option for moving services to noSQL databases and many already did.

Its not that existing Oracle databases cannot support the system. We have many rich features and products from Oracle which can be made to work together to support huge internet applications. But there are many vantage points to consider when we are designing (more...)

NoSQL? No Thanks

There continues to be a disproportionate amount of hype around 'NoSQL' data stores.  By disproportionate I mean 'completely and utterly out of scale with the actual problems of the vast majority of companies'.  I wrote before about 'how NoSQL became more SQL'.  The point I made there is now more apparent the more I work with companies on Big Data challenges. There are three worlds of data

Six things to make your Big Data project succeed

So I wrote about why your Hadoop project will fail so I think its only right that I should follow up with some things that you can do to actually make the Big Data project you take on succeed.  The first thing you need to do is stop trying to make 'Big Data' succeed and instead start focusing on how you educate the business on the value of information and then work out how to deliver new (more...)

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Twelve: Concluding Remarks

On the twelfth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Twelve drummers drumming. The relational camp put productivity, ease-of-use, and logical elegance front and center. However, the mistakes and misconceptions of the relational camp prevent mainstream database management systems from achieving the performance level required by modern applications. For example, Dr. Codd forbade […]

Six reasons your Big Data Hadoop project will fail in 2014

Ok so Hadoop is the bomb, Hadoop is the schizzle, Hadoop is here to solve world hunger and all problems.  Now I've talked before about some of the challenges around Hadoop for enterprises but here are six reasons that Information Week is right when it says that Hadoop projects are going to fail more often than not. 1. Hadoop is a Java thing not a BI thing The first is the most important

2014 technology ambitions – just the two

As this the traditional time to layout resolutions for the year here are my 2 database related ones.

To understand more about some of the newer technologies and to advance my use of APEX as a means of providing reporting information around the systems and people I manage.

Having worked with the base Oracle RDBMS, and latterly SQL Server, for around 20 years I must admit that I am not as familiar with such terms (more...)

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Eleven: Mistakes of the relational camp

On the eleventh day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Eleven pipers piping. Over a lifespan of four and a half decades, the relational camp made a series of strategic mistakes that made NoSQL and Big Data possible. The mistakes started very early. The biggest mistake is enshrined in the first sentence of […]

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Ten: Big Data

On the tenth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Ten lords a-leaping. The topic of Big Data is often encountered when talking about NoSQL so let’s give it a nod. In 1998, Sergey Brin and Larry Page invented an algorithm for ranking web pages (The Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search […]

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Nine: NoSQL Taxonomy

On the ninth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Nine ladies dancing. NoSQL databases can be classified into the following categories: Key-value stores: The archetype is Amazon Dynamo of which DynamoDB is the commercial successor. Key-value stores basically allow applications to “put” and “get” values but each (more...)

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Eight: Oracle NoSQL

On the eighth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Eight maids a-milking. Soon after publishing a scathing indictment of NoSQL in May 2011, Oracle abruptly reversed course and released its own NoSQL offering in September 2011 at OpenWorld. Oracle removed the NoSQL criticism from its website but (more...)

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Seven: Schemaless Design

On the seventh day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Seven swans a-swimming. As we discussed on Day One, NoSQL consists of “disruptive innovations” that are gaining steam and moving upmarket. So far, we have discussed functional segmentation (the pivotal innovation), sharding, asynchronous replication, eventual consistency (resulting from (more...)

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Six: The False Premise of NoSQL

On the sixth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Six geese a-laying. The final hurdle was extreme performance, and that’s where the Dynamo developers went astray. The Dynamo developers believed that the relational model imposes a “join penalty” and therefore chose to store data as “blobs.” (more...)

The Twelve Days of NoSQL: Day Five: Replication and Eventual Consistency

On the fifth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me Five golden rings. By now, you must be wondering when I’m going to get around to explaining how to create a NoSQL database. When I was a junior programmer, quite early in my career, my friends and I were assigned (more...)

ADF UI with MongoDB for persistence

The sample application (JDeveloper 12c / 12.1.2) can be downloaded from here.
This is a simple ADF application whose underlying business service implementation uses MongoDB for persistence.
The application allows create & update operations on a one-to-many data model (Department-Employees)

As shown in the screenshot below, you can (more...)

RDBMS and their bundle-mates

Relational DBMS used to be fairly straightforward product suites, which boiled down to:

  • A big SQL interpreter.
  • A bunch of administrative and operational tools.
  • Some very optional add-ons, often including an application development tool.

Now, however, most RDBMS are sold as part of something bigger.

“Disruption” in the software industry

I lampoon the word “disruptive” for being badly overused. On the other hand, I often refer to the concept myself. Perhaps I should clarify. :)

You probably know that the modern concept of disruption comes from Clayton Christensen, specifically in The Innovator’s Dilemma and its sequel, The Innovator’s Solution. The basic (more...)

The refactoring of everything

I’ll start with three observations:

  • Computer systems can’t be entirely tightly coupled — nothing would ever get developed or tested.
  • Computer systems can’t be entirely loosely coupled — nothing would ever get optimized, in performance and functionality alike.
  • In an ongoing trend, there is and will be dramatic refactoring as (more...)

How to implement Document Versioning with Couchbase

Introduction Developers are often asking me how to "version" documents with Couchbase 2.0. The short answer is: the clients and server do not expose such feature, but it is quite easy to implement. In this article I will use a basic approach, and you will be able to extend (more...)