INSERT /*+ APPEND */ Hint Does Not Seem to Work Consistently

I ran the following SQL in an Oracle 11.2.0.1 database:

SQL> create table tab1
  2  (col1 number)
  3  /
 
Table created.
 
SQL> alter session set sql_trace = true
  2  /
 
Session altered.
 
SQL> insert /*+ append */ into tab1 select 1 from dual
  2  /
 
1 row created.
 
SQL> commit
  2  /
 
Commit complete.
 
SQL> insert /*+ append */ (more...)

Clustering_Factor = 0

I looked at clustering_factor in the previous post and wondered what might cause it to be well below the number of blocks in the table. Chris Saxon suggested it might be due to rows with null values. I decided to look first at the two indexes with a clustering_factor of zero in the same Oracle 11.2 database and checked which columns they were on. Then I looked to see how many of the rows (more...)

Clustering_Factor

I attended the UKOUG conference early in December. While I was there, I went to a presentation by Chris Saxon, where he explained how Oracle decides when to use an index. The example below, which I ran in an Oracle 11.1 database, is based on what I learnt.
 
I used to believe that if a where clause only returned a small percentage of the rows in a table, Oracle would use an (more...)

A Simple Example of an Index Organised Table Without Overflow

For a long time I have had a note on my task list to learn about index organized tables. I never got round to doing it because I thought I would never see one. However, I came across several in a 3rd party application recently. An index organized table is a kind of index and table combined. You can see how they work in the example below, which I tested in an Oracle 11. (more...)

A Problem with REVOKE

If you grant the DBA role to a user, Oracle also grants it the UNLIMITED TABLESPACE system privilege. If you then revoke the DBA role from this user, Oracle also revokes its UNLIMITED TABLESPACE system privilege. This isn’t too much of an issue.
 
However, if you grant the UNLIMITED TABLESPACE system privilege to a user by itself THEN grant it the DBA role, Oracle seems to have no idea where the UNLIMITED TABLESPACE system (more...)

GRANT SELECT Updates LAST_DDL_TIME

DDL stands for Data Definition Language. The CREATE TABLE, ALTER TABLE and DROP TABLE statements are examples of DDL. LAST_DDL_TIME is a column in the USER_OBJECTS view. It records the date and time of the most recent DDL statement applied to the object in question. Even granting SELECT access on a table will update its LAST_DDL_TIME. You can see this in the example below, which I tested in an Oracle 11.2 database.
 

PRAGMA EXCEPTION_INIT

You can use one of these to link an exception name with an Oracle error number. Once you have done this, you can use the exception name in the exception block which follows the declaration. You can see what I mean in the example below, which I tested in an Oracle 11.2 database. First I set up a table so I could test the procedure I was going to create:
 
SQL> create table (more...)

SQL Monitor details for later tuning.

Tuning has always being good fun and something like a challenge for me.

From time to time we are being asked to find out why something did run slow while you are sleeping; answering this question is, in most cases, a challenge.

The problem:

My batch did run slow last night, can you let us know why? Or why did this query run slow? Are questions we, as DBAs, have to answer from time to (more...)

Extending Oracle Enterprise Manager (EM) monitoring.

I always found Oracle Enterprise Manager (EM) to be an interesting tool for different reasons. The only thing I missed was an easy way to create my own alerts.

It is very simple to create a KSH, Perl, etc script to do some customised monitoring and notify you by email, Nagios, NetCool, etc.

By integrating your scripts with OEM, you will have an easy way to enhance your monitoring and still have notification by email, SNMP traps, etc. as you would currently have if your company is using OEM for monitoring your systems.

The problem:
Develop an easy way to (more...)

How to list files on a directory from Oracle Database.

Couple of days ago I had an interesting request, “How can I see the contents of nfs_dir”?

The problem:

We were using DBFS to store our exports. This was the perfect solution as the business could “see” the files on the destination folder, but it did not meet our requirements performance wise on our Exadata.

We have decided to mount NFS and performance did improve, but we had a different problem. NFS is mounted on the database server and business do not have access for security reasons and segregation of duties.

Since then, the export jobs run, but business could (more...)

ORA-16072: a minimum of one standby database destination is required

This is a quick post regarding the error on the subject. This is the second time it happens to me, so I thought I will write a bit about it.

The problem:

I am refreshing one of my UAT environments (happens to be a Full Rack Exadata) using Oracle RMAN duplicate command. Then the following happens (on both occasions).

1.- Duplicate command fails (lack of space for restoring archivelogs, or any other error). This is can be fixed quite easy.

2.- following error while trying to open the database after restore and recover has finished:

SQL> alter database  (more...)

How to transfer files from ASM to another ASM or filesystem or DBFS…

I had a requirement of transferring files from our PROD ASM to our UAT ASM as DBFS is proving to be slow.

The problem:

We are currently refreshing UAT schemas using Oracle Datapump to DBFS and then transferring those files to UAT using SCP.

DBFS does not provided us with the performance we need as datapump files are quite big. Same export onto ASM or NFS proves to be much, much faster.

We are currently testing exports to ASM, but, how to move dmp files from PROD ASM to UAT ASM?

The solution:

The answer for us is using DBMS_FILE_TRANSFER. (more...)

Archive area +RECO has -7440384 free KB remaining (Usable_file_MB is negative)

I must say, this has been a busy weekend.

We have been promoting a release to production and a guaranteed restore point was created on Friday as rollback strategy. On Sunday I was called as we started to receive alerts.

The problem:

Our monitoring system started to send emails and SNMP Traps with the following alerts:

OEM alert for Automatic Storage Management +ASM4_ssssss4: Disk group RECO has used 100% of safely usable free space. (Current Disk Group Used % of Safely Usable value: 100)
OEM alert for Automatic Storage Management +ASM2_ssssss2: Disk group RECO has used 100% of safely usable  (more...)

Exadata Administration – CellCLI

One of the big differences between Exadata and Non-Exadata systems is the necessity to administer the Exadata Storage Server.

The first time you have to configure the Server side, it has to be done through KVM (Keyboard, Video, Mouse), meaning you will need to be physically near your server. Once the initial configuration steps have been performed, we shall be able to administer the Exadata Storage Servers over the network (i.e. SSH protocol or redirect the KVM console to your desktop using the Sun Integrated Lights Out Management – ILOM – remote client).

Once you are in the server, (more...)

Check status voting disk.

This is a quick blog as to how to check the status of Voting Disks.

The problem:

You receive a call/email from you 1st line support with something similar to:

----
[cssd(9956)]CRS-1604:CSSD voting file is offline: o/xxx.xxx.xx.xx/SYSTEMDG_CD_05_SSSSSin; details at (:CSSNM00058:) in /apps/oracle/grid_11.2/log/sssss/cssd/ocssd.log.
----

The solution:

Easy to check using crsctl:

oracle$ crsctl query css votedisk

## STATE File Universal Id File Name Disk group
-- ----- ----------------- --------- ---------
1. ONLINE a0a559213xxxxxxffa67c2df0fdc12 (o/xxx.xxx.xx.xx/SYSTEMDG_CD_05_SSSSSin) [SYSTEMDG]
2. ONLINE 121231203xxxxxxfc4523c5c34d900 (o/xxx.xxx.xx.xx/SYSTEMDG_CD_05_SSSSSin) [SYSTEMDG]
3. ONLINE a6b3c0281xxxxxxf3f6f9f1fd230ea (o/xxx.xxx.xx.xx/SYSTEMDG_CD_05_SSSSSin) [SYSTEMDG]

Located 3 voting disk(s).

As always, comments are welcome.