using AWR on Exadata

Oracle released a brand new Whitepaper for Exadata

How to use AWR Report on Exadata Machines

This Whitepaper gives details how the AWR reports can be used in conjunction with Exadata to monitor and analyze database performance issues

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/availability/exadata-maa-best-practices-155385.html

 

 

 

SparkMeasure, a tool for performance troubleshooting of Apache Spark workloads

SparkMeasure 

 SparkMeasure simplifies the collection and analysis of Spark task metrics data. It is also intended as a working example of how to use Spark listeners for collecting and processing Spark performance metrics.
The work on sparkMeasure has been previously presented in this blog with examples. Recently, an updated version of sparkMeasure (version 0.13) introduces additional integration for the PySpark and Jupyter environments, improved documentation and additional features provided by the community via (more...)

External HDD Performance

This is not a technical post and it’s not related to the database world. It’s just a short experience I had with external HDDs as a simple user so I wanted to share it. I have an Transcend external HDD for quit a while now. It’s a 2TB disk and it was very useful with … Continue reading External HDD Performance

All about headroom and mandatory patching before June 2019

This post was triggered upon rereading a blogpost by Mike Dietrich called databases need patched minimum april 2019. Mike’s blogpost makes it clear this is about databases that are connected using database links, and that:
– Newer databases do not need additional patching for this issue (11.2.0.4, 12.1.0.2, 12.2 and newer).
– Recent PSU patches contain a fix for certain older versions (11.1.0.7, 11.2. (more...)

Power BI 101- Logging and Tracing, Part III

Power BI, like many Microsoft products, is multi-threaded.  This can be seen from the logs and even the Task Manager.  I know, I know…you’ve probably heard this part all before…

The importance of this information, is that the logs will display Process IDs, (PID) that are separate from the main Power BI Desktop executable, including the secondary processes..  Moving from the Power BI logs that reside in the Performance folder, (see Part (more...)

Power BI 101- Logging and Tracing, Part II

So we went over locations and the basics of logging and tracing in Power BI.  I now want to know how to make more sense from the data.  In Oracle, we use a utility called TKProf, (along with others and a number of third party tools) to make sense of what comes from the logs.  SQL Server has Log Analytics and the profiler, but what can I do with Power BI?

First, (more...)

Power BI 101 – Log Files and Tracing

Knowing where log files are and how to turn on debugging is an essential part of any technical job and this goes for Power BI, too.  Remember, as I learn, so does everyone else….Come on, pretty please?

Power BI Desktop

Log files and traces can be accessed one of two ways-

  • Via the Power BI Application
  • Via File Explorer

In the Power BI application, go to File –> Options and Settings –> (more...)

ADF Postback Payload Size Optimization

Recently I came across property called oracle.adf.view.rich.POSTBACK_PAYLOAD_TYPE. This property helps to optimize postback payload size. It is described in ADF Faces configuration section - A.2.3.16 Postback Payload Size Optimization. ADF partial request is executing HTTP post with values from all fields included. When postback property is set to dirty, it will include into HTTP post only changed values. As result - server will get only changed attributes, (more...)

Power BI and the Speed(ier) Desktop

I can be an extremely impatient person about anything I think should be faster.

I’m diving in deep with Power BI and for most of the early on lessons, the data sources used are Excel and…ahem…Microsoft Access.  I don’t know a DBA alive that enjoys working with Access.  Its great for the common user to have a database application, but we can barely use the words “Access” and “Database” in the same (more...)

Introducing SQLdb360: merging eDB360 and SQLd360, while rising the bar to community engagement

Today, we are very happy to release SQLdb360, a new tool that merges together eDB360 and SQLd360, under a single package.

Tools eDB360 and SQLd360 can still be used independently, but now there is only one package to download and keep updated. All the new features and updates to both tools are now in that one package.

The biggest change that comes with SQLdb360 is the kind invitation to everyone interested to contribute (more...)

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the (more...)

Long-running delete of synopses during table stats gathering

Oracle 11.2.0.4

I recently encountered one long-running session and several blocked sessions, all performing the same delete operation.

--SQL_ID dsf21kcbjqfyk
DELETE FROM SYS.WRI$_OPTSTAT_SYNOPSIS$ WHERE BO# = :B2 AND INTCOL# = :B1;

One session had been running for several hours, and the other sessions were all blocked by a row lock from the first session. Unfortunately, each of these sessions was trying to gather stats on new partitions of tables as part (more...)

SJK is learning new tricks

SJK or (Swiss Java Knife) was my secret weapon for firefighting various types of performance problems for long time.

A new version of SJK was released not too long ago and it contains а bunch of new and powerful features I would like to highlight.

ttop contention monitoring

SJK is living it's name by bundling a number of tool into single executable jar. Though, ttop is a likely single most commonly used tool under SJK (more...)

Oracle ADF BC REST – Performance Review and Tuning

I thought to check how well ADF BC REST scales and how fast it performs. For that reason, I implemented sample ADF BC REST application and executed JMeter stress load test against it. You can access source code for application and JMeter script on my GitHub repository. Application is called Blog Visitor Counter app for a reason - I'm using same app to count blog visitors. This means each time you are accessing blog page (more...)

A look into oracle redo, part 11: log writer worker processes

Starting from Oracle 12, in a default configured database, there are more log writer processes than the well known ‘LGWR’ process itself, which are the ‘LGnn’ processes:

$ ps -ef | grep test | grep lg
oracle   18048     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:13 ora_lgwr_test
oracle   18052     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:06 ora_lg00_test
oracle   18056     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:00 ora_lg01_test

These are the log writer worker processes, for which the minimal amount is equal to the amount public (more...)

FillFactor for UPDATE

What is FillFactor in PostgreSQL?

As per offical Doc —

fillfactor (integer)

The fillfactor for a table is a percentage between 10 and 100. 100 (complete packing) is the default. When a smaller fillfactor is specified, INSERT operations pack table pages only to the indicated percentage; the remaining space on each page is reserved for updating rows on that page. This gives UPDATE a chance to place the updated copy of a row on the (more...)

A look into oracle redo: index and overview

I gotten some requests to provide an overview of the redo series of blogposts I am currently running. Here it is:

https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-1-redo-allocation-latches/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-2-the-discovery-of-the-kcrfa-structure/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-3-the-log-writer-work-cycle-overview/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/a-look-into-into-oracle-redo-part-4-the-log-writer-null-write/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/27/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-5-the-log-writer-writing/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/03/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-6-oracle-post-wait-commit-and-the-on-disk-scn/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/03/19/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-7-adaptive-log-file-sync/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/03/26/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-8-generate-redo/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/04/03/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-9-commit/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/04/09/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-9a-commit-concurrency-considerations/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-10-commit_wait-and-commit_logging/

A look into oracle redo, part 9a: commit – concurrency considerations

During the investigations of my previous blogpost about what happens during a commit and when the data becomes available, I used breaks in gdb (GNU debugger) at various places of the execution of an insert and a commit to see what is visible for other sessions during the various stages of execution of the commit.

However, I did find something else, which is very logical, but is easily overlooked: at certain moments access to (more...)

Oracle to Postgres — Index Skip Scan

I have been working on Oracle to Postgres migration and it has been a fun ride.

One of the recent encounters during migration was performance issue in Postgres for a query, actually quite a simple query.

SELECT count(*) AS num_incidents FROM audit_cs acs INNER JOIN audit_changes ac ON acs.audit_change_id = ac.audit_change_set WHERE acs.object_id=$1 AND ac.path = 'Flag' AND ac.new_value = 'sign' 

Let’s look at the execution plan in Postgres

+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
 (more...)

No Asynchronous I/O When Using Shared Server (Also Known As MTS)

I've recently had a case at a client where it was questioned why a particular application was seemingly not making full use of the available I/O capabilities - in comparison to other databases / applications using similar storage.

Basically it ended up in a kind of finger pointing between the application vendor and the IT DBA / storage admins, one side saying that the infrastructure used offers insufficient I/O capabilities (since the most important application (more...)