A look into oracle redo, part 11: log writer worker processes

Starting from Oracle 12, in a default configured database, there are more log writer processes than the well known ‘LGWR’ process itself, which are the ‘LGnn’ processes:

$ ps -ef | grep test | grep lg
oracle   18048     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:13 ora_lgwr_test
oracle   18052     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:06 ora_lg00_test
oracle   18056     1  0 12:50 ?        00:00:00 ora_lg01_test

These are the log writer worker processes, for which the minimal amount is equal to the amount public (more...)

FillFactor for UPDATE

What is FillFactor in PostgreSQL?

As per offical Doc —

fillfactor (integer)

The fillfactor for a table is a percentage between 10 and 100. 100 (complete packing) is the default. When a smaller fillfactor is specified, INSERT operations pack table pages only to the indicated percentage; the remaining space on each page is reserved for updating rows on that page. This gives UPDATE a chance to place the updated copy of a row on the (more...)

A look into oracle redo: index and overview

I gotten some requests to provide an overview of the redo series of blogposts I am currently running. Here it is:

https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-1-redo-allocation-latches/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-2-the-discovery-of-the-kcrfa-structure/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-3-the-log-writer-work-cycle-overview/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/a-look-into-into-oracle-redo-part-4-the-log-writer-null-write/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/02/27/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-5-the-log-writer-writing/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/03/05/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-6-oracle-post-wait-commit-and-the-on-disk-scn/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/03/19/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-7-adaptive-log-file-sync/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/03/26/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-8-generate-redo/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/04/03/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-9-commit/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/04/09/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-9a-commit-concurrency-considerations/
https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/a-look-into-oracle-redo-part-10-commit_wait-and-commit_logging/

A look into oracle redo, part 9a: commit – concurrency considerations

During the investigations of my previous blogpost about what happens during a commit and when the data becomes available, I used breaks in gdb (GNU debugger) at various places of the execution of an insert and a commit to see what is visible for other sessions during the various stages of execution of the commit.

However, I did find something else, which is very logical, but is easily overlooked: at certain moments access to (more...)

Oracle to Postgres — Index Skip Scan

I have been working on Oracle to Postgres migration and it has been a fun ride.

One of the recent encounters during migration was performance issue in Postgres for a query, actually quite a simple query.

SELECT count(*) AS num_incidents FROM audit_cs acs INNER JOIN audit_changes ac ON acs.audit_change_id = ac.audit_change_set WHERE acs.object_id=$1 AND ac.path = 'Flag' AND ac.new_value = 'sign' 

Let’s look at the execution plan in Postgres

+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
 (more...)

A look into oracle redo, part 7: adaptive log file sync

This is the seventh part of a blog series about oracle redo.

Adaptive log file sync is a feature that probably came with Oracle version 11.2. Probably means I looked at the undocumented parameters of Oracle version 11.1 and do not see any of the ‘_adaptive_log_file_sync*’ parameters. It was actually turned off by default with versions 11.2.0.1 and 11.2.0.2, and was turned on by default since version (more...)

Reference Costs

The partitioning option “partition by reference” is a very convenient option which keeps acquiring more cute little features, such as cascading truncates and cascading splits, as time passes – but what does it cost and would you use it if you don’t really need to.

When reference partitioning came into existence many years ago, I had already seen several performance disasters created by people’s enthusiasm for surrogate keys and the difficulties this introduced for partition (more...)

No Asynchronous I/O When Using Shared Server (Also Known As MTS)

I've recently had a case at a client where it was questioned why a particular application was seemingly not making full use of the available I/O capabilities - in comparison to other databases / applications using similar storage.

Basically it ended up in a kind of finger pointing between the application vendor and the IT DBA / storage admins, one side saying that the infrastructure used offers insufficient I/O capabilities (since the most important application (more...)

Linux timing and scheduling granularity

During investigating how Oracle works with regards to waiting, I discovered an oddity. I was researching for my redo blog posts, and found that in a certain case, Oracle uses the ‘nanosleep’ system call. As the name of this system call suggests, this call allows you to let a process sleep with nanosecond precision.

The oddity that I found, was the following:

$ strace -Tp 42
...
nanosleep({0, 1000}, NULL)              = 0 <0.000253>
nanosleep({0, 1000},  (more...)

Friday Philosophy – Explaining How Performance Tuning Is Not Magic?

Solving performance issues is not magic. Oh, I’m not saying it is always easy and I am not saying that you do not need both a lot of knowledge and also creativity. But it is not a dark art, at least not on Oracle systems where we have a wealth of tools and instrumentation to help us. But it can feel like that, especially when you lack experience of systematically solving performance issues.

SQL statement (more...)

Oracle Database Physical I/O IOPS And Throughput Benchmark

General Information

I've used a similar set of scripts quite a few times now to provide feedback to customers that wanted to get a more realistic picture of the I/O capabilities from a database perspective, rather than relying on artificial benchmarks performed outside - or even inside, think of I/O calibration - the database. Although there are already several Oracle benchmark toolkits available, like Swingbench and in particular SLOB, that run inside the database I (more...)

A look into Oracle redo, part 6: oracle post-wait commit and the on disk SCN

This is the sixth part in a blog series about Oracle database redo. The previous posts provided information about the log writer writing, this post is about the process that is waiting after issuing commit for the log writer to write it’s redo from the public redo strand. When the database is using post/wait for process commits, the committing process follows the following (simplified) procedure:

kcrfw_redo_gen_ext: 
 kcsgbsn8: kcsnew8: commit SCN is fetched from kcsgscn_
 kslgetl:  (more...)

A look into Oracle redo, part 5: the log writer writing

| Feb 27, 2018

This the the fifth blog in a series of blogposts about Oracle database redo. The previous blog looked into the ‘null write’ (kcrfw_do_null_write actually) function inside kcrfw_redo_write_driver, which does housekeeping like updating SCNs and posting processes if needed, this blog looks into what happens when the log writer is actually posted by a process or if public redo strand buffers have been written into. In part 3 of this blog series (the log writer working (more…)

Oracle Exadata Smart Flash Logging

What is Exadata Smart Flash Logging?

In an OLTP environment, it is crucial to have fast response times to redo log writes i.e. low latency.  When multiplexing redo logs for high availability i.e. to protect against hardware failure, redo log writes are only acknowledge when redo is written to all redo log members i.e when the slowest disk completes the write.  By this nature, whenever a disk slows down even (more...)

How to fix queries on DBA_FREE_SPACE that are slow

I found myself in a situation where OpsView a monitoring tool, was having difficulty monitoring the tablespaces for a particular pluggable database.

Upon investigation it was found the queries against the dictionary table DBA_FREE_SPACE were taking a very long time:

SQL> set timing on
SQL> select nvl(sum(dfs.bytes)/1024/1024,0) from dba_free_space dfs where dfs.tablespace_name = 'USERS';

NVL(SUM(DFS.BYTES)/1024/1024,0)
-------------------------------
 70.75

Elapsed: 00:00:10.98

There are 60 tablespaces in this pluggable database, which the time varied (more...)

How to Enable Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache

Please check the following blog post “How to check if Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache is Enabled” for:

  • What is Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache?
  • What are the Performance Benefit of Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache?
  • How to check if Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache is Enabled?
  • Pre-requisites and minimum versions.

You can also get more info from My Oracle Support (MOS) note:
Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache – FAQ (Doc ID 1500257.1)
OTN Article: Oracle Exadata Database (more...)

How to check if Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache is Enabled

What is Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache?

Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache provide the ability to cache not only read I/Os but write I/O to the Exadata’s PCI flash on the storage cells.  Exadata storage software 11.2.3.2.1 or higher and Grid Infrastructure and Database software 11.2.0.3.9 or higher is required to use Exadata Write-Back Flash Cache, which is persistent across storage cell restarts.

The default since April 2017 for (more...)

Adapting and adopting SQL Plan Management (SPM)

Introduction

This post is about: “Adapting and adopting SQL Plan Management (SPM) to achieve execution plan stability for sub-second queries on a high-rate OLTP mission-critical application”. In our case, such an application is implemented on top of several Oracle 12c multi tenant databases, where a consistent average execution time is more valuable than flexible execution plans. We successfully achieved plan stability implementing a simple algorithm using PL/SQL calling DBMS_SPM public APIs.

Chart below depicts a typical (more...)

Friday Fun SQL Lesson – union all

Our office kitchen is unavailable this Friday, so the call was put out for pub lunch.

After a couple of replies I decided to enter my reply, in full nerd mode.
select * from people_coming_to_lunch;

People
--------
Kate
Scott
Karolina

3 rows selected.
And of course one of the other SQL geeks (name redacted) replied to extend the data set.
select * from people_coming_to_lunch
union
select 'Shanequa'
from dual;
And I couldn't help myself. I (more...)

Adaptive Query Performance Fixes for #DB12c Release 1

We all know adaptive query feature introduced in Oracle Database Release 1 is a problem. Recently I had the opportunity to review few 12cR1 databases and found that to alleviate the performance problems, the DBA set parameter OPTIMIZER_FEATURES_ENABLE=11.2.0.4 in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2). This observation is the catalyst for the blog “Adaptive Query …