Just how fast is TimesTen In-Memory Database?

The TimesTen In-Memory Database can have excellent performance on even commodity hardware. RDBMS performance has two important factors, latency and throughput. Latency is about how fast SQL Select, Insert, Update, Delete or Merge operations can be completed. TimesTen is known for enabling really low latency SQL transactions. We measure TimesTen latency in microseconds rather than milliseconds:

TimesTen latency on commodity hardware

This latency benchmark was run on commodity Linux / Intel hardware:

OBIEE Component Status Notifications

At Rittman Mead, we often hear requests for features or solutions generally not provided by Oracle. These requests range from commentary functionality to custom javascript visualizations. There are many ways to implement these functionalities, but organizations often lack the in-house resources to engineer an acceptable solution.

Rittman Mead has the capability to engineer any solution desired, and in many cases, has already developed a solution. Many of our accelerators currently offered, such as Chit Chat (more...)

#Javaland 2017 wrap up

Yes – I did it again and attend Javaland conference in Phantasialand Brühl.

It was not easy this year to concentrate on the sessions because of the hottest march of the last 100 years. But the quality of the sessions beats the weather. Maybe again my invest in reading the abstracts and filter the sessions before the conference has payed off.

Day 1 Conference

Jens Schauderdocumentation & slides with AsciiDoc, Git, Gradle and Reveal.js

(more...)

On Measuring Apache Spark Workload Metrics for Performance Troubleshooting

Topic: This post is about measuring Apache Spark workload metrics for performance investigations. In particular you can find the description of some practical techniques and a simple tool that can help you with Spark workload metrics collection and performance analysis. The post is released with accompanying code on GitHub: sparkMeasure

Introduction to Spark performance instrumentation

  
From recent experience I find that scalability and performance are some of the key motivating factors that drive people (more...)

Business rules, common sense and query performance

Very often, significant performance benefits can be obtained by using some very basic knowledge of the application, its data and business rules. Sometimes even less than that: even if you are not familiar with the application logic at all, you can still use common sense to make some reasonable guesses that would get you a long way in improving query’s performance. Here is an example (based on an actual query that I had to tune (more...)

Significant Improvement for WebLogic Start-Up Time on macOS Sierra

I have faced really slow WebLogic start-up times after upgrade to recent versions of macOS Sierra. It turns out to be common problem related to JVM start-up on macOS systems, nothing to do with WebLogic itself. Solution is to register mapping between 127.0.0.1 and your computer name in hosts file, read more on Stack Overflow - Jvm takes a long time to resolve ip-address for localhost. This issue seems to appear with (more...)

New Events for Data Guard and Synchronous Redo Transport in 12c (2)

After the baseline has been established in the first part of this series it’s time to measure the effect of the network in this part. The second test will introduce an interesting feature: Using Linux’s own Traffic Shaper/Quality of Services module I will add a delay of 100ms to the Data Guard network interface card (NIC) to slow things down a little.

WARNING: this is of course a lab or VM-only situation. I can’t (more...)

LNS and LOG_BUFFER

In a oracle data guard environment Log Network Server (LNS) process transports the redo from the primary to the standby site. The behavior of LNS process is different from SYNC and ASYNC mode replication. In ASYNC mode transport, LNS read the redo from log buffer and hand over it to the RFS process in the target site. It is not necessary the redo is always available in the buffer cache. If there is not enough (more...)

New Performance Analytics Release

Poor performance is one of the most common complaints we hear upon arrival to customer sites, and often for good reason. When users have time to “make the rounds” before the system returns a result (if it returns a result at all), they have the right to be frustrated.

Unfortunately, tracking down the origins of performance issues can be extremely difficult, as the root cause could be one or more problems across several distinct systems. (more...)

New Events for Data Guard and Synchronous Redo Transport in 12c (1)

I may have said it before but I consider presenting and teaching a great way to expand one’s knowledge: first of all it requires me to really understand a subject. Secondly, when presenting, you get lots of interesting questions that can turn into blog posts like this one.

Lately I have been asked about the impact of synchronous log shipping to a physical standby database. I was sure there was an effect to be observed, (more...)

Reading Execution Plans for Parallel DML

Parallel execution in Oracle seems to be a topic of myths, mysteries and misunderstandings. In this post I hope to clear up at least one of them by diving into a discussion about parallel DML. Actually, I want to show you two things that can go wrong with it.

My demo setup and case are pretty simple, I just create two copies of dba_objects:

SQL> create table a as select * from dba_objects;

Table created.

 (more...)

Long Parsing and PGA limits

Recently I’ve seen not so smart optimizer behavior: one query took long time to parse, and ended with an error hitting PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT in few minutes; another query was just parsed for ages while using reasonable (under 2G :)) amount of PGA and still could hit PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT but after way more time – up to an hour.


Both cases were similar and involved queries which were accessing views; and those views’ code is generated by an (more...)

Performing in the cloud – network latency

To me, ‘cloud computing’ is renting a compute resource to perform a task. In order to use that compute resource, you need to instruct it to do something, which is typically done via the network. If the task the compute resource needs to fulfil is being an application server or being a client or both in the case of an application server that uses an Oracle database, the network latency between the client of the (more...)

ilOUG meetup: Oracle 12c New Features For Better Performance (slides)

It’s been a while since the Israeli user group (iloug) had a technology meetup (SIG meeting). The last time that happened was over two years ago – and since then, we only had the bigger conferences with guests from all over the world. Yesterday we renewed that long time tradition and held such a meetup.

Although I am not part of the OUG board (and not for the lack of trying, just no elections for (more...)

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance – Part 4 – Network

In the last part of this installment I'll have a brief look at the network performance measured in the Oracle DBaaS environment, in particular the network interface that gets used as private interconnect in case of RAC configuration. The network performance could also be relevant when evaluating how to transfer data to the cloud database.

I've used the freely available "iperf" tool to measure the network bandwidth and got the following results:

[root@test12102rac2 ~]# iperf3 (more...)

Long-running INSERT

On one of the databases I’m looking after (11.2.0.4, Solaris, non-RAC), several different INSERT statements (all into tablespaces with manually managed segments) suffer from occasional hiccups. The symptoms are always the same: in one of the sessions, the INSERT gets stuck doing lots of single-block I/O against one of the indexes on the inserted table, and if other sessions are running similar INSERTs, they hang on enq: TX – index contention. The (more...)

APEX Survey Results: Addressing Performance

Yep, I'm still doing this. A bunch of questions to come, many worth the visit. Just a few weeks between drinks, so to speak. My annual review is a little late, too. Anyway...

Time for the performance questions in my 2015 survey. A favourite topic of mine, and my boss, Penny Cookson, lives for tuning.

Q9. How do you proactively address performance? (tick all that apply)




Tune SQL - I would be surprised if this (more...)

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance – Part 3 – Storage – 12.2 Update

Recently I repeated the I/O related tests on a 12.2.0.1 instance for curiosity and was surprised by the fact that I consistently got significantly better results as on 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.2.

Now you're probably aware that the version 12.2 so far is "cloud-only", so I can't tell / test whether the version 12.2 is generically providing that increased performance or whether Oracle has optimized (more...)

Script: Inactive Parallel QC Holding Parallel Processes

Working on a data warehouse system can be quite challenging, as I mentioned in the post from yesterday. One of the things we need to take care of is the amount of parallel processes that are in used at all times. Yesterday I wrote about how to locate downgraded sessions. Today we will look at another aspect – who “steals” parallel processes and what can we do to solve it.

One of the biggest thieves (more...)

Script: Finding Session With Downgraded Parallel Execution

I was working with the data warehouse team at a customer site and at some point we realized that some parallel executions are not getting enough resources (downgraded).

Not getting enough parallel processes in such a complex environment is really bad. That means that since everybody is hogging the CPU, some sessions will not be able to complete inside the night ETL time frame. If that happens – some ETLs will go on into the (more...)