Average Active Sessions (AAS)

Description The Average Active Sessions (AAS) metric is a very good indicator of the database activity. This metric represents the number of sessions, either working or waiting for a resource at a specific point in time. Idle sessions are not included in the calculation of this metric. To calculate AAS, we need another metric called [...]

The post Average Active Sessions (AAS) appeared first on Oracle DBA Scripts and Articles (Montreal).

When Joins Go Bad

So far in the joins series we’ve looked at the effect removing joins (via denormalization) has on performance. We’ve seen that joins can cause primary key looks to do more work. Lowering the normalization level to remove these can negatively impact “search” style queries though. More importantly, we’ve seen the real cost of denormalizing to remove joins is when updating records, potentially leading to concurrency waits and application bugs.

So are joins always “good”?

The (more...)

Oracle instance activity repartition

Description This query will show you repartition percentage between I/O, WAITS and CPU from the v$active_session_history view Be careful, this view is part of the diagnostic pack, you should not query this view if you don’t have license for it. Instance activity repartition [crayon-533ee1b43b0b3323059005/] This query returns percentage of I/O, CPU and waits consumed by [...]

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Denormalizing for Performance is a Bad Idea – Your Updates are Killing Me

In the previous article in the joins series we compared query performance between a third normal form schema and the same schema denormalized to second normal form. We then extended it the example so our denormalized schema was in just first normal form.

The normalized approach performed better overall. The differences were small though – generally just a few consistent gets and all the queries executed in under a second. As Jeff Atwood points out (more...)

Cache anomaly

Just a quick heads-up for anyone who likes to play around with the Keep and Recycle caches.

In 11g Oracle introduced the option for serial direct path reads for tablescans on tables that was sufficiently large – which meant more than the small_table_threshold – provided the table wasn’t already sufficient well cached.  (The rules mean that the choice of mechanism can appear to be a little random in the production environment for tables that are near (more...)

BI Forum 2014 preview – No Silver Bullets : OBIEE Performance in the Real World

I’m honoured to have been accepted to speak at this year’s Rittman Mead BI Forum, the sixth year of this expert-level conference that draws some of the best Oracle BI/DW minds together from around the world. It’s running May 8th-9th in Brighton, and May 15-16th in Atlanta, with an optional masterclass from Cloudera’s Lars George the day before the conference itself at each venue.

My first visit to the BI Forum was in 2009 (more...)

Denormalizing for Performance Is a Bad Idea

Continuing the series on joins, I’m going to look at denormalization. This process reduces the number of joins necessary to return results for a schema.

One of the big arguments against normalizing data is “for performance”. The process of normalization creates new tables as relations are decomposed according to their functional dependencies. This means (more) joins are necessary to return the same results.

A google of “database normalization performance” turns up several articles like this (more...)

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A minor update 4.01 to the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

These are the notes from the change log:

- More info for RAC Cross Instance Parallel Execution: Many sections now show a GLOBAL aggregate info in addition to instance-specific data

- The Parallel Execution Server Set detection and ASSUMED_DEGREE info now makes use of the undocumented PX_STEP_ID and PX_STEPS_ARG info (bit mask part (more...)

Top 10 queries from v$active_session_history

Description This query return the top 10 queries by resource consumption (CPU+IO+WAIT) in the last hour from v$active_session_history. Be careful, this view is part of the diagnostic pack, you should not query this view if you don’t have license for it. top 10 queries from v$active_session_history [crayon-533b91631cebb871999454/] This query return top queries by resources consumed, [...]

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Built-In OBIEE Load Testing with nqcmd

nqcmd ships with all installations of OBIEE and includes some very useful hidden functionality – the ability to generate load tests against OBIEE. There are lots of ways of generating load against OBIEE, but most require third party tools of varying degrees of complexity to work with.

It’s easy to try this out. First set the OBIEE environment:  [I'm using SampleApp v309R2 as an example; your FMW_HOME path will vary]

. ~/obiee/instances/instance1/bifoundation/OracleBIApplication/coreapplication/setup/bi-init.sh

and then the (more...)

Introducing obi-metrics-agent – an Open-Source OBIEE Metrics Collector

Understanding what is going on inside OBIEE is important for being able to diagnose issues that arise, monitor its health, and dig deep into its behaviour under stress in a load test. OBIEE exposes a set of metrics through the Dynamic Monitoring Service (DMS) and viewable through Enterprise Manager (EM) Fusion Middleware Control. EM is a great tool but doesn’t meet all requirements for accessing these metrics, primarily because it doesn’t (more...)

Recent Updates of OraLatencyMap and PyLatencyMap

Topic: This post introduces the latest changes to OraLatencyMap and PyLatencyMap, two custom tools for collecting and displaying Oracle wait event latency details using heatmaps.

OraLatencyMap is a SQL*Plus tool, with a core written in PL/SQL, aimed at studying Oracle random I/O by displaying the latency drill-down of the wait event 'db file sequential read' using heatmaps. The tool can also be used to collect and display event latency histograms for any other Oracle wait (more...)

Which SQL Server instance is consuming all my CPU/memory?

For anyone running Windows 2008 (or above), you can simply add the “Command Line” column to the Task Manager view. From there, the instance name will follow the “-s” startup option, for example: C:\…\Binn\sqlservr.exe” –sPREPROD If you’re on Windows 2000/2003 then it’s not quite as straight forward. You can either get the Process ID from

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APEX 5 first peek – Performance

APEX 5 EA has shown some interesting improvements in regard to performance.

Icons

If you haven't noticed the swelling trend of flat designs in the past few years, you haven't been using the internet or held a smart device. Here are three good articles about this modernism, and like me you may learn the word skeuomorphic.

How does this affect APEX? Well of course all the icons have changed again.
How does this affect (more...)

Tuning with ASH Analytics in #em12c

Performance tuning of the Oracle Database has always been a great thing to learn and a valuable skill for any database administer.  In a previous post, I talked about how to use the Active Workload Repository (AWR) and Active Session History (ASH) to performance turn a database.  In this post, I want to take a look at the Active Session History (ASH) Analytics that can be found in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c.

Active (more...)

tweaking the entropy pool for a better SOA performance

At my current assignment, I’ve gone to great lengths to improve the Oracle SOA Enterprise Manager Console performance. One of the actions I took, was purging about 700 gigabytes of data from the dehydration store. Although that solved lots of other problems, the EM still wasn’t very responsive. Loading composite details could take op to 20 minutes, it they ever loaded at all. Apparently, the database was ok, because there was no load at all (more...)

Performance Tuning with AWR & ASH in #em12c

Oracle monitoring and performance tuning has grown over the years.  With every release of the Oracle database the monitoring capabilities that have been provided have evolved.  In Oracle11g, monitoring with statpack has given way to Automatic Workload Repository (AWR) and Active Session History (ASH) for near real time monitoring of items within the Oracle database.  Adding AWR and ASH to your performance tool kit can yield huge savings of time to tuning (more...)

IT Stockholm Syndrome

Shrugging

Random thoughts on a Friday afternoon…

We’ve all got problems. More to the point, every IT department or team has problems of some kind. It’s why we hire consultants, buy products, start long and arduous journeys into the great unknown depths of root cause analysis, and so on.

What fascinates me is the level at which we come to identify with our problems. When I’ve gone into an environment to deliver recommendations, the conversation usually (more...)

Wait Event History Sampling, an Experiment in Oracle Performance Analysis

Topic: This post is about a performance analysis technique based on high frequency sampling of wait event history data in Oracle. Two scripts are provided for performing this type of analysis and two example cases are discussed applied to the study random read latency and read workload characterization.

Context: In the context of performance analysis, for example for a study of I/O response time, I want to analyze the flow of all wait events for (more...)

Logons Cumulative

The logons cumulative statistic in V$SYSSTAT shows how many sessions have connected since the database was opened. If this value is too high, there could be shell scripts looping round and connecting then disconnecting from the database. This can have a detrimental effect on performance.

SQL> col name format a20
SQL> select * from v$sysstat where name = 'logons cumulative'
  2  /

STATISTIC# NAME                 CLASS      VALUE      STAT_ID
---------- -------------------- ---------- ---------- ----------
0          logons (more...)