RAC, 12c and Direct Path Reads

Yes, direct path reads again :) No worries I’m already a bit bored from digging in this algorithm, so I think this is going to be my last post about it. Till they change it again of course. And yes, in 12.1.0.2 they did. For introduction to DPR, you can check my previous post, because […]

SystemTap into Oracle for Fun and Profit

Topic: This post is about using SystemTap for investigating and troubleshooting Oracle RDBMS. In particular you will learn how to probe Oracle processes and their userspace functions. These techniques aim to be useful as well as fun to learn for those keen into peeking under the hood of the technology and improve their effectiveness in troubleshooting and performance investigations.


Introduction


Userspace probing is a very powerful technique that can be used to complement the available (more...)

JDeveloper 12c ADF View Token Performance Improvement

There is known limitation in ADF 11g, related to accessing application in the same session from multiple browser tabs. While working with multiple browser tabs, eventually user is going to consume all view tokens, he will get timeout error once he returns back to the previous browser tab. Unused browser tab is producing timeout, because ADF 11g is sharing the same cache of view tokens for all browser tabs in the same session. This means (more...)

12c HCC Row-Level Locking

In Oracle Database 12c we can find many new and shiny things… So many that we can miss the little good things really easy. I think that this one, is one of them. Previously I made a post “All About HCC“, describing how HCC is working and some of the issues that we can hit […]

The cost of using an index

When trying to understand why the optimiser might choose not to use an index to read rows from a table, I find the following diagram helpful.

index cost

The axis along the bottom represents the selectivity of the query (0% being no rows selected, 100% being all rows selected), and the axis up the side represents the cost of the chosen operation (more costly = more work to do).

When reading from a table without using an (more...)

Deadlocks due to unindexed foreign keys

Here is a step-by-step analysis of the deadlock which occurs due to unindexed foreign keys. This analysis was performed on Oracle XE 11.2.0.2 – results may vary on other versions.

A typical deadlock graph arising from an unindexed foreign key is as follows.

                       ---------Blocker(s)--------  ---------Waiter(s)---------
Resource Name          process session holds waits  process session holds waits
TM-0000508a-00000000        27     101    SX             28      12         SSX
TX-00090013-0000019b        28      12     X             27     101           S

This type of (more...)

Capturing long-running SQL in Statspack

Oracle 11.2.0.1.0

I have been investigating “enq: TM – contention” wait events, which are almost certainly due to un-indexed foreign keys. One such extreme example which showed up in a Statspack report is as follows :

                                                             Avg          (more...)

Complément : Analyse des performances sur du long terme

Scaling up Cardinality Estimates in 12.1.0.2

Topic: Counting the number of distinct values (NDV) for a table column has important applications in the database domain, ranging from query optimization to optimizing reports for large data warehouses. However the legacy SQL method of using SELECT COUNT (DISTINCT <COL>) can be very slow. This is a well known problem and Oracle 12.1.0.2 provides a new function APPROX_COUNT_DISTINCT implemented with a new-generation algorithm to address this issue by providing (more...)

Being Right and Proving It

One of the great things about working in IT is that you can often win an argument simply by being right. Not because of who you are or because you are more eloquent than others, but because the facts support your position. Almost every IT person I have ever met respects facts.

In order to win arguments this way, you of course need some facts to work with. And that’s where too many people fail. (more...)

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 4.1 of the XPLAN_ASH utility is available for download.

As usual the latest version can be downloaded here.

This version in particular supports now the new 12c "Adaptive" plan feature - previous versions don't cope very well with those if you don't add the "ADAPTIVE" formatting option manually.

Here are the notes from the change log:

- GV$SQL_MONITOR and GV$SQL_PLAN_MONITOR can now be customized in the
settings as table names in (more...)

B-tree and nulls

Today while I was scrolling my “WordPress reader” page I saw a post which reminds me to something I had fun before /and find it useful in many situations/: So if we have an index based on null column followed by not null column we can use it to filter the rows with null value. […]

FIRST_ROWS_n Optimizer Mode – What is Wrong with this Statement?

June 8, 2014 It has been nearly two years since I last wrote a review of an Oracle Database related book, although I have recently written reviews of two Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 books and a handful of security cameras in the last two years.  My copy of the second edition of the “Troubleshooting Oracle […]

Simora: Alpha Testers Confirmed

It's been a while since I provided any public updates regarding Simora, our Oracle workload simulation product. It's finally time to unveil the status of Simora and our steps moving forwards. We have been working extensively on the Simora engine and infrastructure over the  last several months, with a view to transforming it into a […]

Flame Graphs for Oracle

Topic: This post is a hands-on introduction to using on-CPU Flame Graphs for investigating Oracle workloads. This technique is about collecting and analyzing sampled stack trace data to analyze and troubleshoot Oracle processes at the OS level (in particular applied to Linux).

Motivations: The techniques and tools described here can be used for performance investigations to complement wait-event based information gathered from the Oracle engine, such as information available with ASH and sql monitoring. They (more...)

A Closer Look at CALIBRATE_IO

Topic: This blog entry is about investigating Oracle's DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER.CALIBRATE_IO

Spoiler: If you have reached this article in search of a tool for quantitative analysis of storage performance and in particular for measuring random read I/O in Oracle, I'd rather advise you to use tools that allow generating test workloads in a controlled manner, in a way that can be understood and measured and in particular with latency details together with IOPS measurements. For example (more...)

Solaris 11 – IPS Local Repository

A fast and straight approach for creating local IPS repository. CREATING THE REPOSITORY The steps are basic: 1.Download the repository; 2.Concatenate the iso files; 3.Mount the iso; 4.Create the zfs dataset; 5.Create the repository; 6.Copy the repository; 7.Build the search index; 8.Set the repository; 9.Unmount the iso; Code example: Note – pkg set-publisher: -G ‘*’ […]

Recent Updates of OraLatencyMap and PyLatencyMap

Topic: This post introduces the latest changes to OraLatencyMap and PyLatencyMap, two custom tools for collecting and displaying Oracle wait event latency details using heatmaps.

OraLatencyMap is a SQL*Plus tool, with a core written in PL/SQL, aimed at studying Oracle random I/O by displaying the latency drill-down of the wait event 'db file sequential read' using heatmaps. The tool can also be used to collect and display event latency histograms for any other Oracle wait (more...)

Which SQL Server instance is consuming all my CPU/memory?

For anyone running Windows 2008 (or above), you can simply add the “Command Line” column to the Task Manager view. From there, the instance name will follow the “-s” startup option, for example: C:\…\Binn\sqlservr.exe” –sPREPROD If you’re on Windows 2000/2003 then it’s not quite as straight forward. You can either get the Process ID from

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IT Stockholm Syndrome

Shrugging

Random thoughts on a Friday afternoon…

We’ve all got problems. More to the point, every IT department or team has problems of some kind. It’s why we hire consultants, buy products, start long and arduous journeys into the great unknown depths of root cause analysis, and so on.

What fascinates me is the level at which we come to identify with our problems. When I’ve gone into an environment to deliver recommendations, the conversation usually (more...)