Python cx_Oracle 5.3 for Oracle Database Released

| Mar 9, 2017
Today we are pleased to announce the release of cx_Oracle 5.3, the extremely popular Python interface for Oracle Database. Binary and source bundles can be installed from PyPi, as normal. cx_Oracle 5.3 works with Python version 2.7, and with versions 3.4 and higher. You can use cx_Oracle with Oracle 11.2, 12.1 and... [Read More]

Getting started with Oracle PaaS Service Manager Command Line Interface (PSM)

Oracle PaaS Service Manager (PSM) provides a command line interface (CLI) with which you can manage the lifecycle of various services in Oracle Public Cloud. This opens the door for scripting (recurring) tasks – such as (re)deployment of applications on ACCS to provisioning new environments. PSM makes performing admin operations on the Oracle Public Cloud a lot easier and efficient, compared to using the the GUI.

Note that the CLI is a thin wrapper over (more...)

New Performance Analytics Release

Poor performance is one of the most common complaints we hear upon arrival to customer sites, and often for good reason. When users have time to “make the rounds” before the system returns a result (if it returns a result at all), they have the right to be frustrated.

Unfortunately, tracking down the origins of performance issues can be extremely difficult, as the root cause could be one or more problems across several distinct systems. (more...)

Install EasyGUI on Fedora

The EasyGUI library is a nice tool for developing GUI applications. It doesn’t require you to know event-driven programming to write basic GUI applications because it’s based on Python functions.

You can download and install the EasyGUI library with yum utility like this:

yum install -y python-easygui

It should generate the following list:

Loaded plugins: langpacks, refresh-packagekit
mysql-connectors-community                                  | 2.5 kB  00:00     
mysql-tools-community                                       | 2.5 kB  00:00     
mysql56-community                                           | 2.5 kB  00:00     
 (more...)

OBIEE 12c – Regression Tester for Application Roles and Mappings

Allow me to introduce you to the Application Role Mapping validation script for OBIEE 12c. With this bit of code, we can utilize OBIEE's runcat command script to export our application role and permissions mapping information from multiple environments, and ensure their consistency. The picture below is an example of what you'll see as the final product. While it does not show you a side by side comparison of both environments, what it does (more...)

Building Classrooms in the Cloud

Jumpbox Lab Server

Let’s face it: education without interaction is about as effective as shouting origami instructions at a lumberjack who is cutting down trees. Sure, your informative lessons will come in handy when the product of their work finally becomes paper, but it will be long forgotten and ultimately worthless by then. The only way a student is going to learn is if they can put (more...)

Basic Python Object

One of my students wanted a quick example of a Python object with getters and setters. So, I wrote a little example that I’ll share.

You define this file in a physical directory that is in your $PYTHONPATH, like this:

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class Coordinate:
  def __init__ (self, x, y):
    self.x = x
     (more...)

Create a Python Module

Sometime formal programming documentation is less than clear. At least, it’s less than clear until you’ve written your first solution. The Modules section of the Python language is one of those that takes a few moments to digest.

Chapters 22 and 23 in Learning Python gives some additional details but not a clear step-by-step approach to implementing Python modules. This post is designed to present the steps to write, import, and call a Python module. (more...)

Python for loops

It’s always interesting to explain a new programming language to students. Python does presents some challenges to that learning process. I think for loop can be a bit of a challenge until you understand them. Many students are most familiar with the traditional for loop like Java:

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) { ... }

Python supports three types of for loops – a range for loop, a (more...)

Install cx_Oracle for Python

This shows you how to install the cx_Oracle library for Python 2.7 on Fedora Linux. If Fedora has it on the server you can download it with the following yum command:

yum install -y cx_Oracle-5.2.1-11g-py27-1.x86_64.rpm

Currently, you’ll get the following failure because it’s not available in the Fedora repository:

Loaded plugins: langpacks, refresh-packagekit
mysql-connectors-community                                      | 2.5 kB  00:00:00     
mysql-tools-community                                           | 2.5 kB  00:00:00     
mysql56-community                                               | 2.5  (more...)

Fabric … Simple #GoldenGate Administration over SSH

 

For awhile now, I’ve been looking at different approaches for automating some of my GoldenGate monitor tasks. Yes, there are tools out there that provide a wide variety of ways for interaction and monitoring of Oracle GoldenGate. However, the problem with Oracle GoldenGate is that you have at least two parts of the equation when interacting or monitoring an environment, i.e. source and target. If you are so lucky to have a multi-master (more...)

A Neural Network Scoring Engine in PL/SQL

Topic: In this post, you will find an example of how to build and deploy a basic artificial neural network scoring engine using PL/SQL for recognizing handwritten digits. This post is intended for learning purposes, in particular for Oracle practitioners who want a hands-on introduction to neural networks.


Introduction

Machine learning and neural networks in particular, are currently hot topics in data processing. Many tools and platform are now easily available to work and experiment  (more...)

“What do you mean there’s line breaks in the address?” said SQLLDR

I had a large-ish CSV to load and a problem: line breaks inside some of the delimited fields.

Like these two records:

one, two, "three beans", four
five, six, "seven
beans", "eight wonderful beans"

SQL Loader simply won’t handle this, as plenty of sad forum posts attest. The file needs pre-processing and here is a little python script to do it, adapted from Jmoreland91’s solution on Stack Overflow.

import sys, csv, os
 
 (more...)

Changing SOA properties via WLST





Hereby a script to change some properties for SOA Suite. These are some generic settings such as:


  • soa-infra
  • AuditLevelGlobalTxMaxRetry
  • DisableCompositeSensors
  • DisableSpringSESensors
  • mediator
  • AuditLevel
  • bpel
  • AuditLevel
  • SyncMaxWaitTime
  • Recovery Schedule Config
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;
import javax.management.Attribute;
import javax.management.MBeanServerConnection;
import javax.management.ObjectName;
import javax.management.Query;
import javax.management.QueryExp;
import javax.management.openmbean.CompositeDataSupport;
import (more...)

Rename multiple exported Files after using SQL Developer’s Cart to export from Oracle database

If you’re searching for “export Oracle BLOB”, the article, by Jeff Smith, titled “Exporting Multiple BLOBs with Oracle SQL Developer” using Oracle SQL Developer” is usually at the top of the search result. The SQL Developer features the Shopping Cart without using scripts to export BLOBs out of database. I don’t want to go into detail as Jeff already explained well in his post what it is and how to use it. One (more...)

Multisessioning with Python

I'll admit that I pretty constantly have at least one window either open into SQL*Plus or at the command line ready to run a deployment script through it. But there's time when it is worth taking a step beyond.

One problem with the architecture of most SQL clients is they connect to a database, send off a SQL statement and do nothing until the database responds back with an answer. That's a great model when (more...)

Wanted: RDBMS superpower summary for app developers

At last night's WWCode Cincinnati panel, I recommended that developers talk to their DBA about what advanced capabilities their RDBMS can offer, so that they don't end up reimplementing functionality in the app that are already available (better and more efficiently) in the database itself. Devs can waste a lot of effort by thinking of databases as dumb, inert data boxes.

I was asked an excellent question: "Where can a dev quickly familiarize herself with (more...)

IoT Hackathon Part IV : Using Web Services to send Sensordata

In the previous 3 posts, building towards the eProseed IoT Hackathon, I described how to setup your Raspberry Pi, and how to use the GrovePi sensors. The used example is a small weather-station that read temperature and humidity and shows the readings on a display. That is all very nice, however, the data remains local on the Raspberry Pi so there is nothing that we can do with this information

Code Studio rocks; diversity does, too

If you want to quickly get some kids introduced to computer programming concepts, you could do a lot worse than using Code Studiofrom code.org. That's what I did the last couple weeks - took two hours to lightly shepherd the Dayton YWCA day camp through a programming intro.

It's really well-organized and easy to understand - frankly, it pretty much drives itself. It's based on block-dragging for turtle graphics and/or simple 2D games, (more...)

Generating Diceware Passwords in Python

Today I’m going back to a theme from a post last year and looking at generating passwords with my favourite programming language. A tweet from Simon Brunning pointed me to Micah Lee’s article at The Intercept and my first thought was to write a function to do this in Python. So here it is;

def generate_diceware_password(word_count=6):
    import random
    word_dict = {}
    passphrase = []
    with open('diceware.wordlist.andy.txt') as f:
        for line in f. (more...)