Log Buffer #517: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

This Log Buffer Edition covers Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL.

Oracle:

Protecting Financial Data with Oracle WebCenter and Adobe LiveCycle

Oracle Forms 12c oracle.security.jps.JpsException Error after Database change

The Future of Content Management: Oracle Content & Experience Cloud

Today Oracle released a very large „monster“ Upgrade. This July 2017 Update includes the first time the new RU „Release Upgrade“ and RUR „Release Update Revision“ Patches.

Cloud Ward: Who Will Win the Battle (more...)

Machine Learning in Oracle Database – Classification of Conference Abstracts based on Text Analysis

Machine Learning is hot. The ability to have an automated system predict, classify, recommend and even decide based on models derived from past experience is quite attractive. And with the number of obvious applications of machine learning – Netflix and Amazon recommendations, intelligent chat bots, license plate recognition in parking garages, spam filters in email servers – the interest further grows. Who does not want to apply machine learning?

This article shows that the Oracle (more...)

Optimistic ORA_ROWSCN 2: the SCN

In my previous post, I covered lost updates. Before saying how ORA_ROWSCN can help avoid them, I need to talk about the SCN. It's hard to be simple and correct about such a fundamental element of the Oracle database, but I'll try.

Role of # in SQL*Plus

Uncategorized
| Jul 13, 2017
The # character is for commenting in SQL*Plus, right?

The character # has been mostly used for comments in many languages, such as shell scripts and python. Interestingly # is legal syntax in SQL scripting as well; but is it considered a comment? The answer is no; it's not. The purpose of # in SQL scripts is very different. and you should be very careful using it.

Entering # tells SQL*Plus to temporarily pauses what (more...)

How to find the Oldest and Newest Interval Partition

I required to find the oldest and newest interval partition to be able to do some automated maintenance, but found query USER_TAB_PARTITIONS, ALL_TAB_PARTITIONS and DBA_TAB_PARTITIONS was a bit tricky as the HIGH_VALUE is a LONG data type 😦

A quick search on the web and I found a perfect solution from my good friend Tim Hall (Oracle Base), who created a function to convert the LONG into a DATE by executing the HIGH VALUE 🙂

(more...)

Unpivot mit Oracle

Vor einigen Wochen hat Jonathan Lewis einen Artikel zum Verhalten von UNPIVOT in Oracle veröffentlicht. Darin zeigt er mit Hilfe eines CBO-Traces, dass die UNPIVOT-Operation intern in eine Kombination mehrerer über UNION ALL verknüpfter Queries umgewandelt wird. Interessant ist dabei, dass die Zahl der Blockzugriffe (Buffers-Angabe in den rowsource-Statistiken) nicht höher ist als bei einem einzelnen Full Table Scan. Jonathan Lewis vermutet, dass der zugehörige code path dafür sorgt, dass die Blöcke im Cache Batch-weise (more...)

Adding a Datafile to Tablespace

When monitoring Tablespace Usage (see my Tablespace Usage blog post for more info), there comes a point when you need to add a datafile to a tablespace to allow for growth and more importantly get below a monitoring threshold for example in OEM or OpsView.

Query to see Current Datafiles State

To see the current state of the datafiles:

set pages 999
set lines 400
col FILE_NAME format a75
select d.TABLESPACE_NAME, d.FILE_NAME, d. (more...)

Querying Tablespace Usage

Tablespace management in an Oracle database is important and something a DBA will do quite frequently.  Therefore I wrote a query, which I believe I originally got from the internet and then it evolved by me adding in temp tablespace and few other things 🙂

Query for Tablespace Usage

Query to obtain Tablespace Usage:

set pages 999
set lines 400
SELECT df.tablespace_name tablespace_name,
 max(df.autoextensible) auto_ext,
 round(df.maxbytes / (1024 * 1024), 2) max_ts_size,
 round((df. (more...)

Removing Outliers using stddev()

A colleague asked me about removing outliers from reports and I knew just the function to give a go.

Some time ago I had to prove that some data we had conformed to a normal distribution. Remember those from high school?
A normal distrubition (bell curve)
That request was about 2007 and I ended up using stddev() and lpad() to produce a vertical shaped bell curve in SQL*Plus. That was pretty cool.

As for removing (more...)

OGh Tech Experience 2017 – recap

On June 15th and 16th 2017 the very first OGh Tech Experience was held. This 2-day conference was a new combination of the DBA Days and Fusion Middleware Tech Experience that were held in previous years. To summarize: OGh hit bullseye. It was two days packed with excellent in-depth technical sessions, good customer experiences and great networking opportunities.

The venue was well chosen. De Rijtuigenloods in Amersfoort is a former maintenance building of the Dutch (more...)

Oracle SQL Strip Quotes

Somebody wanted to know how to strip double quotes from strings. Obviously, they’re playing with the DBMS_METADATA package. It’s quite simple, the TRIM function does it, like this:

SELECT TRIM(BOTH '"' FROM '"Hello World!"') AS "Message"
FROM   dual;

It will print:

Hello World!

As always, I hope this helps those looking for a solution.

Write (Even) Less with More – VALIDATE_CONVERSION

I wrote the post Write Less with More – Part 8 – PL/SQL in the WITH Clause in November 2015, when the latest released Oracle version was 12.1.
In that post I explained about PL/SQL in the WITH Clause – a new 12.1 feature – and demonstrated it using the following example:

todo8

Since then Oracle 12.2 was released, and introduced a new feature that enables solving this task in a simpler way – the VALIDATE_CONVERSION function. This function gets an expression and a data type, and returns 1 if the expression can be converted to the data type and 0 if not.
Using the same setup from the original post, the requested query becomes as simple as:

> select *
  from   people
  where  general_info is not null
  and    validate_conversion(general_info as date, 'dd/mm/yyyy') = 1;

PERSON_ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME       GENERAL_INFO
---------- ---------- --------------- --------------------
       102 Paul       McCartney       18/6/1942
       202 Ella       Fitzgerald      15/6/1996
       203 Etta       James           20/1/2012

In addition to introducing the new VALIDATE_CONVERSION function, the older CAST and some of the TO_* conversion functions have been enhanced in Oracle 12.2 and include a DEFAULT ON CONVERSION ERROR clause, so when data type conversion fails we can get some default value instead of an error.

> select p.person_id,
         p.first_name,
         p.last_name,
         to_date(p.general_info default null on conversion error, 'dd/mm/yyyy') my_date
  from   people p;

 PERSON_ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME       MY_DATE
---------- ---------- --------------- ----------
       101 John       Lennon
       102 Paul       McCartney       18/06/1942
       103 Ringo      Starr
       104 George     Harisson
       201 Louis      Armstrong
       202 Ella       Fitzgerald      15/06/1996
       203 Etta       James           20/01/2012
       317 Julie      Andrews

8 rows selected.

The post Write (Even) Less with More – VALIDATE_CONVERSION appeared first on @DBoriented.

Avoiding Lost Updates with ORA_ROWSCN

Applications today use "optimistic locking" to avoid lost updates. Tom Kyte thought of using ORA_ROWSCN for optimistic locking, then decided it didn't work (see ORA_ROWSCN for optimistic locking). I now think it does!

PL/SQL in SQL in View in SQL in PL/SQL

I presented “Write Less (Code) With More (Oracle 12c New Features)” yesterday at OGh Tech Experience 2017.
One of the features I talked about was PL/SQL in the WITH Clause. One of the restrictions of this feature is that you cannot embed a static SQL query, that contains PL/SQL in the WITH clause, in PL/SQL (see the section PL/SQL in SQL in PL/SQL in this post).
I was asked, regarding this restriction, if it’s (more...)

Password Expire

If a user forgets his password, he may ask you to reset it for him. You will then know his new password, which you may see as a security issue. By including the password expire clause in the alter user command, you can force the user to change his password the next time he logs in. After this, you will no longer know his password. The examples which follow show a DBA changing a password (more...)

Log Buffer #512: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

This Log Buffer Edition covers Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL.

Oracle:

Upgrade Existing TDE to Use New Unified Key Management in 12c Upgraded Database (non-cdb)

Instrumentation … not just for debugging

12.2 Index Deferred Invalidation (Atomica)

Collation in 12cR2 – when AA equals Å (or not?)

Configuring Oracle Traffic Director 12c with WebGate

SQL Server:

PowerShell Scripting to Replicate Cloud & SaaS Data to SQL Server

Comparing and Synchronizing Two Folders with Azure

(more...)

RETURNING INTO

The RETURNING INTO clause is one of my favorite PL/SQL features. It allows to write less code, improves readability and reduces context switches between PL/SQL and SQL.
In this post I’d like to highlight some less-known characteristics of the RETURNING INTO clause and emphasize differences that exist when it is used in different DML statements.

Supported Statements

The RETURNING INTO clause is supported by the UPDATE, DELETE, and single-table single-row (“values-based”) INSERT statements.
It is (more...)

Did You Know #19 – Using LIKE

The LIKE operator is a very useful one. It is used to match strings with partial match while using the underscore (‘_’) as a single character wildcard and the percentage sign (‘%’) as multiple character wildcard. There are a few things you should know and some tricks you can use with the LIKE operator: The underscore … Continue reading Did You Know #19 – Using LIKE

SQL validation during PL/SQL compilation

A recent posting on SQL.RU asked why Oracle doesn’t raise such errors like “ORA-00979 not a group by expression” during PL/SQL compilation. Since I couldn’t find a link to the answer (though I read about it many years ago, but I don’t remember where…), I’ve decided to post short answer:

During PL/SQL compilation Oracle checks static SQL using only:

  1. Syntactic analysis – Oracle verifies that keywords, object names, operators, delimiters, and so on are (more...)

Adding a Column with a Default Value and a Constraint

The Constraint Optimization series:


In the previous parts of this series I showed that Oracle does a nice optimization – that may save plenty of time – when we add in a (more...)