Fundamentals of SQL Writeback in Dodeca

One of the features of Dodeca is read-write functionality to SQL databases.  We often get questions as to how to write data back to a relational database, so I thought I would post a quick blog entry for our customers to reference.

This example will use a simple table structure in SQL Server though the concepts are the same when using Oracle, DB2, and most other relational databases.  The example will use a simple Dodeca (more...)

REGEXP_LIKE Behavior

Often, the biggest problem with regular expressions is that those who use them sometimes don’t use them correctly. A great example occurs in the Oracle Database with the REGEXP_LIKE function. For example, some developer use the following to validate whether a string is a number but it only validates whether the first character is a number.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
DECLARE
  lv_input  VARCHAR2(100 (more...)

Create MySQL Index

Indexes are separate data structures that provide alternate pathways to finding data. They can and do generally speed up the processing of queries and other DML commands, like the INSERT, UPDATE, REPLACE INTO, and DELETE statements. Indexes are also called fast access paths.

In the scope of the InnoDB Database Engine, the MySQL database maintains the integrity of indexes after you create them. The upside of indexes is that they can improve (more...)

Write Less with More – Part 4 (Temporal Validity)

This post is part 4 of the Write Less with More series of blog posts, focusing on new features of Oracle 12c that allow us developers to write less than in previous versions in order to achieve the same functionality. Each part is dedicated for one new feature that solves some common development task. For more details, including the setup of the examples used throughout the series and the list of development tasks that drive (more...)

SQL*Plus Tricks

Have you ever wondered how to leverage substitution variables in anonymous block programs? There are several tricks that you can use beyond passing numeric and string values to local variable. The generic default appears to take a number unless you cast it as a string but that’s not really the whole story. The first two are standard examples of how to use numeric and string substitution values.

The following accept a numeric substitution value:

When X+0 and X-0 are not the same

In the old days, when the Rule Based Optimizer (RBO) ruled, there was a very common technique to help the optimizer choose one plan over the other (if they had the same rank) by preventing the use of an index.

Look at the following query, where there are unique indexes on T1.ID and T2.ID and non-unique indexes on T1.A and T2.B:

select *
  from T1,T2
 where T1.ID = T2.ID
    (more...)

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the EXPLAIN PLAN Part 40: Why is it so hard to get SQL performance right the first time?

In the August 2015 issue of the NoCOUG Journal, we asked Stéphane Faroult why it is so hard to get SQL performance right the first time. His answer implies that SQL itself and the way it is taught are the problems.(read more)

Using CALIBRATE_IO

Using Oracle’s Resource Manager requires you to understand the IO dynamics. The first step requires you to run the CALIBRATE_IO procedure from the DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER package.

Oracle provides some great examples about how to use the CALIBRATE_IO procedure of the DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER package in the Oracle Database Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference. The CALIBRATE_IO procedure returns the best answer when you provide a valid number of files, which you can capture by querying the V$ASM_DISK view.

(more...)

Free Oracle Tuning Book

Quick Start Guide to Oracle Query TuningWho can resist a free book Rich Nimeiec book on SQL Tuning? O.K., those who know everything can resist. If you’re like me, this is an opportunity to learn from Rich. Click on the book image or this link to get a free copy, or if you want to pay $10 for a copy click here to buy Quick Start Guide to Oracle Query Tuning: Tips for DBAs and Developers from Amazon. (more...)

Add Color to your SQL

Topic: this post is about some simple techniques to add color to SQL scripts and their terminal output using ANSI escape codes.

Colors can be used to improve the output of command line tools. This is common practice, for example with the (bash) shell. Colors can also be very useful to improve the quality of the output of SQL scripts. In my experience this is not used frequently, probably because of the the need of (more...)

Autonomous transaction to the rescue

Use an object in a query?

Using an Oracle object type’s instance in a query is a powerful capability. Unfortunately, Oracle’s SQL syntax doesn’t make it immediately obvious how to do it. Most get far enough to put it in a runtime view (a subquery in the from clause), but then they get errors like this:

SELECT	 instance.get_type()
         *
ERROR AT line 4:
ORA-00904: "INSTANCE"."GET_TYPE": invalid identifier

The problem is how Oracle treats (more...)

Convert CSV file to Apache Parquet… with Drill

Read this article on my new blog A very common use case when working with Hadoop is to store and query simple files (CSV, TSV, ...); then to get better performance and efficient storage convert these files into more efficient format, for example Apache Parquet. Apache Parquet is a columnar storage format available to any project in the Hadoop ecosystem. Apache Parquet has the following

Limit length of listagg

SQL> select student_name, course_id from studentx order by student_name

STUDENT_NAME COURSE_ID
------------ ---------
Chris Jones  A102     
Chris Jones  C102     
Chris Jones  C102     
Chris Jones  A102     
Chris Jones  A103     
Chris Jones  A103     
Joe Rogers   B103     
Joe Rogers   A222     
Joe Rogers   A222     
Kathy Smith  B102     
Kathy Smith  A102     
Kathy Smith  A103   (more...)

SQL Plan Management Choices

My thoughts on SQL plan management decision points:

SPM

SQL Patches are also available and not covered in the above flowchart.


Rounding Amounts, the missing cent: with the MODEL clause

Rounding amounts may lead to rounding-issues, I have written how this may be resolved in a previous blogpost using some analytic functions.
Playing around a little bit, I also came up with a method to resolve the rounding difference with the MODEL clause.

To create an example, first let's create a table with only three records in it.


SQL> create table t
2 as
3 select rownum + 42 id
4 from dual
5 connect (more...)

Rounding Amounts, the missing cent

Dividing a certain amount over several rows can be quite tricky, simply rounding can lead to differences.
Let me try to explain what I mean. When you need to divide 100 by 3, the answer is 33.333333333333 (and a lot more threes).
Money only goes to cents, so if each one gets 33.33, there is a cent missing. (3 times 33.33 equals 99.99)
To solve this cent-problem, we decide that the (more...)

Oracle Database 12c: Statistics created as the data was loaded

As you know, Oracle Magazine July/Aug 2015 issue released. You can free subscribe to Oracle Magazine digital edition and you can read here or you can read technical  articles here.

I subscribed Oracle Magazine, in current issue have very interesting articles.

One of interesting article of Oracle Expert Tomas Kyte (as known AskTom) with title: On Learning from Mistakes


In this article Tom talks about Cost Based Optimizer and shown how optimizer learning from mistakes. (more...)

Row pattern matching nested within hierarchy

I've been playing around with MATCH_RECOGNIZE - the data pattern matching extension to SELECT that was introduced in version 12.

Most examples I've seen have used the default AFTER MATCH SKIP PAST LAST ROW as most often the logic dictates, that when we have found a match in a group of rows, we want to search for further matches after those rows to avoid unwanted "double" matches.

But can there be uses where we want (more...)

Apache Drill : How to Create a New Function?

Read this article on my new blog Apache Drill allows users to explore any type of data using ANSI SQL. This is great, but Drill goes even further than that and allows you to create custom functions to extend the query engine. These custom functions have all the performance of any of the Drill primitive operations, but allowing that performance makes writing these functions a little trickier